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Fundamentals of ultrafast laser processing

Fundamentals of ultrafast laser processing
Fundamentals of ultrafast laser processing
When laser light of visible, near-IR or UV spectral range hits condensed matter, it interacts with the valance and/or conduction electrons of the system under action. Depending on laser intensity and irradiation geometry, the interaction can have different far-reaching consequences such as melting, ablation, changing of optical properties, mechanical and chemical transformations. Among existing laser systems, ultrafast lasers have become an extraordinary tool for processing of any kind of materials. With proper choosing the irradiation conditions, laser action allows either inducing highly-localized gentle modifications or obtaining strongly damaged material sites with desired or deleterious structures such as voids, periodic nanocracks, periodic surface structures or craters of various shapes and dimensions. This chapter presents a review on tremendous efforts of researchers in order to achieve clearer insights into laser-matter interactions in ultrashort irradiation regimes. The review does not pretend to completeness and aims to outline main ideas, achievements, and most intriguing findings still waiting for explanations and theoretical treatments.
9789814267335
99-182
Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd
Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.
f77016c2-3505-436e-9151-c6a82a8598a2
Sugioka, Koji
Cheng, Ya
Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.
f77016c2-3505-436e-9151-c6a82a8598a2
Sugioka, Koji
Cheng, Ya

Bulgakova, Nadezhda M. (2013) Fundamentals of ultrafast laser processing. In, Sugioka, Koji and Cheng, Ya (eds.) Ultrafast Laser Processing: From Micro- to Nanoscale. Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd, pp. 99-182. (doi:10.4032/9789814303699).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

When laser light of visible, near-IR or UV spectral range hits condensed matter, it interacts with the valance and/or conduction electrons of the system under action. Depending on laser intensity and irradiation geometry, the interaction can have different far-reaching consequences such as melting, ablation, changing of optical properties, mechanical and chemical transformations. Among existing laser systems, ultrafast lasers have become an extraordinary tool for processing of any kind of materials. With proper choosing the irradiation conditions, laser action allows either inducing highly-localized gentle modifications or obtaining strongly damaged material sites with desired or deleterious structures such as voids, periodic nanocracks, periodic surface structures or craters of various shapes and dimensions. This chapter presents a review on tremendous efforts of researchers in order to achieve clearer insights into laser-matter interactions in ultrashort irradiation regimes. The review does not pretend to completeness and aims to outline main ideas, achievements, and most intriguing findings still waiting for explanations and theoretical treatments.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360097
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360097
ISBN: 9789814267335
PURE UUID: 0109d2c9-5e66-4a81-a003-0f0fb1e7f8a2

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2013 16:15
Last modified: 10 Jul 2019 16:31

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