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Prospective food diaries demonstrate breastfeeding characteristics in a UK birth cohort

Prospective food diaries demonstrate breastfeeding characteristics in a UK birth cohort
Prospective food diaries demonstrate breastfeeding characteristics in a UK birth cohort
Breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding rates are universally below those recommended by World Health Organization. Due to limitations and challenges associated with researching breastfeeding characteristics, the times when exclusivity is likely to be lost and when women are most likely to discontinue breastfeeding have not yet been identified. Prospective food diaries allow reliable description of the dynamics of breastfeeding to be made to help identify these key time periods. Food diaries detailing intake from birth until the cessation of breastfeeding were analysed for 718 infants recruited into a national arm of an international multicentre birth cohort study (EuroPrevall). Analyses included linear regression analysis and Kaplan–Meier time course analysis. Breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding cessation rates for younger mothers (<25 years) are high in the first few weeks after delivery but slow markedly in the period 10–12 weeks after delivery. Cessation rates are consistent from 0 to 26 weeks in older mothers. This difference in feeding patterns led to significant differences between the two different age groups at 26 weeks for breastfeeding (P?=?0.006) and exclusive breastfeeding at 8 weeks (P?=?0.009). Forty-nine per cent of younger mothers (<25 years) stopped breastfeeding before their infant was 3 weeks old. To increase breastfeeding duration, further work is required to investigate the attitudes and perceptions associated with such high breastfeeding cessation rates in younger mothers during these very early post-natal weeks.
breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, infant feeding, prospective food diaries
1740-8695
703-711
Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Aksoy, Burcu
8783f739-d9f9-4da7-b0ea-c0e2102e84cd
Palmer, Anna
2ea78d08-27cb-47f4-9892-77c704ac08f7
Jenner, Katharine
c8a95ca5-7867-4b29-94b1-177e15173f5b
Oliver, Erin M.
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Maskell, Joe
f10981fc-239d-4a91-acb6-d71cb9586529
Kemp, Terri
05c89e80-2ee7-441c-af37-6e7fc8932af1
Foote, Keith D.
3d6ecd5d-78d2-4385-bd20-4c0a8ac880e2
Roberts, Graham C.
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Ellahi, Basma
52104813-e3e3-42bd-ab8d-707b7a76d9d6
Margetts, Barrie M.
d415f4a1-d572-4ebc-be25-f54886cb4788
Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Aksoy, Burcu
8783f739-d9f9-4da7-b0ea-c0e2102e84cd
Palmer, Anna
2ea78d08-27cb-47f4-9892-77c704ac08f7
Jenner, Katharine
c8a95ca5-7867-4b29-94b1-177e15173f5b
Oliver, Erin M.
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Maskell, Joe
f10981fc-239d-4a91-acb6-d71cb9586529
Kemp, Terri
05c89e80-2ee7-441c-af37-6e7fc8932af1
Foote, Keith D.
3d6ecd5d-78d2-4385-bd20-4c0a8ac880e2
Roberts, Graham C.
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Ellahi, Basma
52104813-e3e3-42bd-ab8d-707b7a76d9d6
Margetts, Barrie M.
d415f4a1-d572-4ebc-be25-f54886cb4788

Grimshaw, Kate E.C., Aksoy, Burcu, Palmer, Anna, Jenner, Katharine, Oliver, Erin M., Maskell, Joe, Kemp, Terri, Foote, Keith D., Roberts, Graham C., Ellahi, Basma and Margetts, Barrie M. (2015) Prospective food diaries demonstrate breastfeeding characteristics in a UK birth cohort. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 11 (4), 703-711. (doi:10.1111/mcn.12052). (PMID:26419217)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding rates are universally below those recommended by World Health Organization. Due to limitations and challenges associated with researching breastfeeding characteristics, the times when exclusivity is likely to be lost and when women are most likely to discontinue breastfeeding have not yet been identified. Prospective food diaries allow reliable description of the dynamics of breastfeeding to be made to help identify these key time periods. Food diaries detailing intake from birth until the cessation of breastfeeding were analysed for 718 infants recruited into a national arm of an international multicentre birth cohort study (EuroPrevall). Analyses included linear regression analysis and Kaplan–Meier time course analysis. Breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding cessation rates for younger mothers (<25 years) are high in the first few weeks after delivery but slow markedly in the period 10–12 weeks after delivery. Cessation rates are consistent from 0 to 26 weeks in older mothers. This difference in feeding patterns led to significant differences between the two different age groups at 26 weeks for breastfeeding (P?=?0.006) and exclusive breastfeeding at 8 weeks (P?=?0.009). Forty-nine per cent of younger mothers (<25 years) stopped breastfeeding before their infant was 3 weeks old. To increase breastfeeding duration, further work is required to investigate the attitudes and perceptions associated with such high breastfeeding cessation rates in younger mothers during these very early post-natal weeks.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 18 June 2013
Published date: October 2015
Keywords: breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, infant feeding, prospective food diaries
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 360148
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360148
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: fac722ff-d77e-498d-a442-bcfaec16b45b

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Date deposited: 27 Nov 2013 14:15
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:15

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