The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Understanding cognitive changes in imagery rescripting: the role of the memory-imagery-self relationship

Understanding cognitive changes in imagery rescripting: the role of the memory-imagery-self relationship
Understanding cognitive changes in imagery rescripting: the role of the memory-imagery-self relationship
Imagery rescripting (IR) is a cognitive-behavioural technique that helps patients to modify the meaning they have attached to negative or traumatic experiences. Although it is effective in addressing memory-related intrusive images and in alleviating disorder-specific symptoms, there is little evidence as to how it works. The aim of this PhD project was to investigate the cognitive changes it promotes. Studies 1 and 2 found that memory recall influences individuals’ sense of self. They report higher state self-esteem, fewer achievement goals, and more recreation/exploration goals after recalling positive memories than after recalling negative ones. They also report more emotional self-cognitions after recalling memories from which they have learnt lessons compared to recalling memories from which they have not abstracted any meaning. Studies 3 and 4 found that exposure and IR may influence individuals’ perception of negative memories and the impact these memories have on them when recalled. After being exposed to such memories and after rescripting them, they perceive these memories as less negative and important for their sense of self. They also report higher state self-esteem and either a weaker or a more positive emotional response after recalling them. The findings suggest that memory recall triggers the activation of different self-representations and that IR may influence this process. By helping individuals modify the meaning they have attached to negative memories, IR may facilitate the integration of these memories within the sense of self. This may make the memories and associated self-representations less salient and less likely to be activated in the presence of distressing stimuli. The implications of these findings for imagery research and clinical practice are discussed.
Cili, Soljana
4b2dd936-d0f8-453c-bfeb-db4417deb88d
Cili, Soljana
4b2dd936-d0f8-453c-bfeb-db4417deb88d
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40
Maguire, Nicholas
ebc88e0a-3c1e-4b3a-88ac-e1dad740011b
KARL, ANKE
7f091050-641c-4658-a247-785cfd194c3d

Cili, Soljana (2012) Understanding cognitive changes in imagery rescripting: the role of the memory-imagery-self relationship. University of Southampton, Psychology, Doctoral Thesis, 232pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Imagery rescripting (IR) is a cognitive-behavioural technique that helps patients to modify the meaning they have attached to negative or traumatic experiences. Although it is effective in addressing memory-related intrusive images and in alleviating disorder-specific symptoms, there is little evidence as to how it works. The aim of this PhD project was to investigate the cognitive changes it promotes. Studies 1 and 2 found that memory recall influences individuals’ sense of self. They report higher state self-esteem, fewer achievement goals, and more recreation/exploration goals after recalling positive memories than after recalling negative ones. They also report more emotional self-cognitions after recalling memories from which they have learnt lessons compared to recalling memories from which they have not abstracted any meaning. Studies 3 and 4 found that exposure and IR may influence individuals’ perception of negative memories and the impact these memories have on them when recalled. After being exposed to such memories and after rescripting them, they perceive these memories as less negative and important for their sense of self. They also report higher state self-esteem and either a weaker or a more positive emotional response after recalling them. The findings suggest that memory recall triggers the activation of different self-representations and that IR may influence this process. By helping individuals modify the meaning they have attached to negative memories, IR may facilitate the integration of these memories within the sense of self. This may make the memories and associated self-representations less salient and less likely to be activated in the presence of distressing stimuli. The implications of these findings for imagery research and clinical practice are discussed.

PDF
Soljana Cili Thesis.pdf - Other
Download (1MB)

More information

Published date: January 2012
Organisations: University of Southampton, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360205
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360205
PURE UUID: f963ea0b-459e-473f-b62b-8d3a7f812a27
ORCID for Nicholas Maguire: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-8068

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jan 2014 12:00
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:51

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×