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What harm, whose justice?: excavating the restorative movement

What harm, whose justice?: excavating the restorative movement
What harm, whose justice?: excavating the restorative movement
The city of Hull in the northeast of England gave itself the ambitious task of becoming the world’s first restorative city. The aim of this strategy was to create a more socially and emotionally confident youth population which in turn would encourage a more entrepreneurial and aspirational outlook across the City. Based on a two-year National Lottery-funded project exploring peoples’
experiences of restorative approaches and a Knowledge Transfer Project to help develop restorative skills, the development of restorative justice is analysed. How does a restorative classroom, workplace, or family really behave? Is there a common objective within, and across, all restorative initiatives and if so, what is it? The answer to these questions is that communication breakdown can be understood as the common harm within, and across the restorative movement. This raises some interesting questions and challenges for zemiology where both restorative justice and social harm perspectives contain quite different notions of harm suggesting that neither has yet developed a clear or solid foundation upon which to build an alternative focus to criminal harms.
1028-2580
445-460
Green, Simon
90cc6315-ee43-4e93-a6ce-037c21a23fcf
Johnstone, Gerry
a13c981e-8f6c-44d9-bd91-a5bb72906741
Lambert, Craig
ea7c6f02-8eff-4627-bfac-c6f8f26873a7
Green, Simon
90cc6315-ee43-4e93-a6ce-037c21a23fcf
Johnstone, Gerry
a13c981e-8f6c-44d9-bd91-a5bb72906741
Lambert, Craig
ea7c6f02-8eff-4627-bfac-c6f8f26873a7

Green, Simon, Johnstone, Gerry and Lambert, Craig (2013) What harm, whose justice?: excavating the restorative movement. Contemporary Justice Review, 16 (4), 445-460. (doi:10.1080/10282580.2013.857071).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The city of Hull in the northeast of England gave itself the ambitious task of becoming the world’s first restorative city. The aim of this strategy was to create a more socially and emotionally confident youth population which in turn would encourage a more entrepreneurial and aspirational outlook across the City. Based on a two-year National Lottery-funded project exploring peoples’
experiences of restorative approaches and a Knowledge Transfer Project to help develop restorative skills, the development of restorative justice is analysed. How does a restorative classroom, workplace, or family really behave? Is there a common objective within, and across, all restorative initiatives and if so, what is it? The answer to these questions is that communication breakdown can be understood as the common harm within, and across the restorative movement. This raises some interesting questions and challenges for zemiology where both restorative justice and social harm perspectives contain quite different notions of harm suggesting that neither has yet developed a clear or solid foundation upon which to build an alternative focus to criminal harms.

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Published date: 5 December 2013
Organisations: History

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Local EPrints ID: 360367
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360367
ISSN: 1028-2580
PURE UUID: f94136aa-b6c8-4fbb-9055-f3adca313c37

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Date deposited: 05 Dec 2013 11:47
Last modified: 25 Nov 2019 20:45

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Contributors

Author: Simon Green
Author: Gerry Johnstone
Author: Craig Lambert

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