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Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial

Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial
Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial
To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles.
METHODS:
198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque.
RESULTS:
Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31.0 Nm s(-1) [95% confidence interval: (1.33-11.80)] in the 2-min group and 33.2 Nm s(-1) (1.66-12.33) in the 12-min group from baseline to 10-week follow-up, corresponding to an increase of 16.0% and 18.2% for the two groups, respectively. The increase was significantly different compared to controls (P<0.05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant relationship existed between changes in rapid force development and pain (r = 0.27, P<0.01), but not between changes in maximal muscle strength and pain.
CONCLUSION:
Small daily amounts of progressive resistance training in adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and, to a less extent, maximal force capacity.
1475-0961
Jay, Kenneth
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schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
Andersen, CH
d1b0b8ca-cb05-43ee-bcd1-a54e17a36355
Ebessen, FH
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Christiansen, DH
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Skotte, J
39a845d7-11e1-4a52-a47b-9a4c31261d60
Zebis, MK
63cdc82d-dca5-4965-a11f-6fed09fb5319
Andersen, LL
c38804a3-820c-427a-bfd6-ed4db9a21e70
Jay, Kenneth
cb40dd68-57b6-478c-b51c-5021137bce51
schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
Andersen, CH
d1b0b8ca-cb05-43ee-bcd1-a54e17a36355
Ebessen, FH
a97f025e-3add-4a0b-b002-ccccd33cdf43
Christiansen, DH
1b5bc864-c316-4e13-a01b-2a6f4a1ae665
Skotte, J
39a845d7-11e1-4a52-a47b-9a4c31261d60
Zebis, MK
63cdc82d-dca5-4965-a11f-6fed09fb5319
Andersen, LL
c38804a3-820c-427a-bfd6-ed4db9a21e70

Jay, Kenneth, schraefel, m.c., Andersen, CH, Ebessen, FH, Christiansen, DH, Skotte, J, Zebis, MK and Andersen, LL (2013) Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 33 (5). (doi:10.1111/cpf.12041). (PMID:23758661)

Record type: Article

Abstract

To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles.
METHODS:
198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque.
RESULTS:
Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31.0 Nm s(-1) [95% confidence interval: (1.33-11.80)] in the 2-min group and 33.2 Nm s(-1) (1.66-12.33) in the 12-min group from baseline to 10-week follow-up, corresponding to an increase of 16.0% and 18.2% for the two groups, respectively. The increase was significantly different compared to controls (P<0.05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant relationship existed between changes in rapid force development and pain (r = 0.27, P<0.01), but not between changes in maximal muscle strength and pain.
CONCLUSION:
Small daily amounts of progressive resistance training in adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and, to a less extent, maximal force capacity.

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Published date: 11 June 2013
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360414
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360414
ISSN: 1475-0961
PURE UUID: c11fe736-d710-4c5b-b7f0-135a87f39e29

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Date deposited: 06 Dec 2013 10:50
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:21

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