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Food & Mood: Explorations in Technological Intervention

Food & Mood: Explorations in Technological Intervention
Food & Mood: Explorations in Technological Intervention
Over-eating is often the result of consuming food for reasons other than needing fuel and nutrients: we eat for pleasure, from habit, for emotional support. Such non-homeostatic eating is an established contributor to overeating towards overweight or obese weight gain that in turn is correlated with numerous non-communicable diseases such as Type II Diabetes Miletus. Traditionally, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and interpersonal Therapy (IPT) approaches help people develop strategies to change these eating responses, but they rely on a person deliberately reaching for those strategies: there has not been a way to provide just-in-time support: emotional eating experience triggers may not happen on a schedule. Our approach is to explore whether and how persistent sensor data may help us determine moments appropriate for intervention.
Caroll, Erin
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schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
Czerwinski, Mary
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Caroll, Erin
21c56771-e5f9-4f9e-b281-c00bf4d768fb
schraefel, m.c.
ac304659-1692-47f6-b892-15113b8c929f
Czerwinski, Mary
11123423-112d-4b3a-8801-fa9c97511175

Caroll, Erin, schraefel, m.c. and Czerwinski, Mary (2013) Food & Mood: Explorations in Technological Intervention. Using Technology to Facilitate Behaviour Change and Support Healthy, Sustainable Living : Workshop inHCI2012 - People & Computers XXVI, Birmingham, United Kingdom. 11 Sep 2012 - 13 Sep 2014 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Over-eating is often the result of consuming food for reasons other than needing fuel and nutrients: we eat for pleasure, from habit, for emotional support. Such non-homeostatic eating is an established contributor to overeating towards overweight or obese weight gain that in turn is correlated with numerous non-communicable diseases such as Type II Diabetes Miletus. Traditionally, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and interpersonal Therapy (IPT) approaches help people develop strategies to change these eating responses, but they rely on a person deliberately reaching for those strategies: there has not been a way to provide just-in-time support: emotional eating experience triggers may not happen on a schedule. Our approach is to explore whether and how persistent sensor data may help us determine moments appropriate for intervention.

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More information

Published date: 12 September 2013
Venue - Dates: Using Technology to Facilitate Behaviour Change and Support Healthy, Sustainable Living : Workshop inHCI2012 - People & Computers XXVI, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 2012-09-11 - 2014-09-13
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

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Local EPrints ID: 360415
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360415
PURE UUID: d4b0ac60-9ce3-473f-978d-e9bf0ca63bc9

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Date deposited: 06 Dec 2013 11:02
Last modified: 09 Jul 2020 16:32

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