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Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers: technology and applications

Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers: technology and applications
Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers: technology and applications
Since the early conceptual and practical demonstrations in the late 1990s, Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibres (HC-PBGFs) have attracted huge interest by virtue of their promise to deliver a unique range of optical properties that are simply not possible in conventional fibre types. HC-PBGFs have the potential to overcome some of the fundamental limitations of solid fibres promising, for example, reduced transmission loss, lower nonlinearity, higher damage thresholds and lower latency, amongst others. They also provide a unique medium for a range of light: matter interactions of various forms, particularly for gaseous media. In this paper we review the current status of the field, including the latest developments in the understanding of the basic guidance mechanisms in these fibres and the unique properties they can exhibit. We also review the latest advances in terms of fibre fabrication and characterisation, before describing some of the most important applications of the technology, focusing in particular on their use in gas-based fibre optics and in optical communications.
1934-2608
315-340
Poletti, Francesco
9adcef99-5558-4644-96d7-ce24b5897491
Petrovich, Marco N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Richardson, David J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3
Poletti, Francesco
9adcef99-5558-4644-96d7-ce24b5897491
Petrovich, Marco N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Richardson, David J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3

Poletti, Francesco, Petrovich, Marco N. and Richardson, David J. (2013) Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers: technology and applications. Journal of Nanophotonics, 2 (5-6), 315-340. (doi:10.1515/nanoph-2013-0042).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Since the early conceptual and practical demonstrations in the late 1990s, Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibres (HC-PBGFs) have attracted huge interest by virtue of their promise to deliver a unique range of optical properties that are simply not possible in conventional fibre types. HC-PBGFs have the potential to overcome some of the fundamental limitations of solid fibres promising, for example, reduced transmission loss, lower nonlinearity, higher damage thresholds and lower latency, amongst others. They also provide a unique medium for a range of light: matter interactions of various forms, particularly for gaseous media. In this paper we review the current status of the field, including the latest developments in the understanding of the basic guidance mechanisms in these fibres and the unique properties they can exhibit. We also review the latest advances in terms of fibre fabrication and characterisation, before describing some of the most important applications of the technology, focusing in particular on their use in gas-based fibre optics and in optical communications.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2013
Additional Information: (Invited)
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360448
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360448
ISSN: 1934-2608
PURE UUID: 483cec8e-7e2c-4d3d-b619-712e04d63ade
ORCID for Francesco Poletti: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1000-3083
ORCID for Marco N. Petrovich: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3905-5901
ORCID for David J. Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7751-1058

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Dec 2013 16:27
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:05

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