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Kidney stones: a fetal origins hypothesis

Kidney stones: a fetal origins hypothesis
Kidney stones: a fetal origins hypothesis
Kidney stones are common, with a multifactorial etiology involving dietary, environmental, and genetic factors. In addition, patients with nephrolithiasis are at greater risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis, although the basis for this is not fully understood. All of these renal stone–associated conditions have also been linked with adverse early-life events, including low–birth weight, and it has been suggested that this developmental effect is due to excess exposure to maternal glucocorticoids in utero. This is proposed to result in long-term increased hypothalamic-pituitary-axis activation; there are mechanisms through which this effect could also promote urinary lithogenic potential. We therefore hypothesize that the association between renal stone disease and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis may be related by a common pathway of programming in early life, which, if validated, would implicate the developmental origins hypothesis in the etiology of nephrolithiasis.
0884-0431
2535-2539
Howels, S.A.
75112740-946b-4f52-9d6d-b22d8478f500
Edwards, M.H.
b81ff294-1d16-4a1b-af14-9374c5989d4c
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Thakker, R.V.
bbd4cb9a-62cd-464d-949c-c231969bad4d
Howels, S.A.
75112740-946b-4f52-9d6d-b22d8478f500
Edwards, M.H.
b81ff294-1d16-4a1b-af14-9374c5989d4c
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Thakker, R.V.
bbd4cb9a-62cd-464d-949c-c231969bad4d

Howels, S.A., Edwards, M.H., Cooper, C. and Thakker, R.V. (2013) Kidney stones: a fetal origins hypothesis. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 28 (12), 2535-2539. (doi:10.1002/jbmr.1993). (PMID:23703881)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Kidney stones are common, with a multifactorial etiology involving dietary, environmental, and genetic factors. In addition, patients with nephrolithiasis are at greater risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis, although the basis for this is not fully understood. All of these renal stone–associated conditions have also been linked with adverse early-life events, including low–birth weight, and it has been suggested that this developmental effect is due to excess exposure to maternal glucocorticoids in utero. This is proposed to result in long-term increased hypothalamic-pituitary-axis activation; there are mechanisms through which this effect could also promote urinary lithogenic potential. We therefore hypothesize that the association between renal stone disease and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis may be related by a common pathway of programming in early life, which, if validated, would implicate the developmental origins hypothesis in the etiology of nephrolithiasis.

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Published date: December 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 360470
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360470
ISSN: 0884-0431
PURE UUID: d3a4e75b-9cd2-48c3-80ec-455ff6905b5e
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 10 Dec 2013 14:12
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:40

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Contributors

Author: S.A. Howels
Author: M.H. Edwards
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: R.V. Thakker

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