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A health visitor for older people in an accident and emergency department

A health visitor for older people in an accident and emergency department
A health visitor for older people in an accident and emergency department
Published studies indicate that older people have special needs on discharge from accident and emergency (A&E) departments that are not always fully met. The literature reflects that although a significant proportion of older people have a decrease in functional independence and an increased need for services following discharge from A&E, social and functional assessment by A&E staff can be inadequate, as can the arrangement of follow-up community services. As part of a wider study into the organization of care for older people in A&E, a health visitor for older people was funded to work part-time in the A&E department of a large NHS Trust. The health visitor identified potential clients through reviewing the A&E documentation of patients aged 75 years or over discharged directly from A&E. Telephone calls or home visits were used to follow up those individuals deemed to be vulnerable by the health visitor. Interventions included health education, referral to other agencies and patient or family counselling. None of the clients followed up by the health visitor (n = 212) had been referred by A&E to a specialist in gerontology, which suggests that these clients would otherwise not have received the potential benefit of specialist intervention. The pilot study described here highlights a number of practical issues in relation to the health visitor post for older people in A&E, including the importance of dedicated office space and access to a telephone. Data collected during the study, plus the positive evaluation of the role by a small group of A&E staff confirm the claims made in other studies (e.g. Runciman et al, 1996) that health visitors for older people may be of value in meeting the post-discharge needs of these people.
1462-4753
75-80
Bridges, J.
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Meyer, J.
50b8fd43-2b12-481c-bb05-9e4bfc38f44a
McMahon, K.
07cb051f-039a-4912-a70e-f5d04448c879
Bentley, J.
bfc593bf-974d-42b8-809c-c1af7760fc7b
Winter, J.
ad57c122-43c1-48cb-a902-398f563ad437
Bridges, J.
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Meyer, J.
50b8fd43-2b12-481c-bb05-9e4bfc38f44a
McMahon, K.
07cb051f-039a-4912-a70e-f5d04448c879
Bentley, J.
bfc593bf-974d-42b8-809c-c1af7760fc7b
Winter, J.
ad57c122-43c1-48cb-a902-398f563ad437

Bridges, J., Meyer, J., McMahon, K., Bentley, J. and Winter, J. (2000) A health visitor for older people in an accident and emergency department. British Journal of Community Nursing, 5 (2), 75-80. (PMID:11125456)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Published studies indicate that older people have special needs on discharge from accident and emergency (A&E) departments that are not always fully met. The literature reflects that although a significant proportion of older people have a decrease in functional independence and an increased need for services following discharge from A&E, social and functional assessment by A&E staff can be inadequate, as can the arrangement of follow-up community services. As part of a wider study into the organization of care for older people in A&E, a health visitor for older people was funded to work part-time in the A&E department of a large NHS Trust. The health visitor identified potential clients through reviewing the A&E documentation of patients aged 75 years or over discharged directly from A&E. Telephone calls or home visits were used to follow up those individuals deemed to be vulnerable by the health visitor. Interventions included health education, referral to other agencies and patient or family counselling. None of the clients followed up by the health visitor (n = 212) had been referred by A&E to a specialist in gerontology, which suggests that these clients would otherwise not have received the potential benefit of specialist intervention. The pilot study described here highlights a number of practical issues in relation to the health visitor post for older people in A&E, including the importance of dedicated office space and access to a telephone. Data collected during the study, plus the positive evaluation of the role by a small group of A&E staff confirm the claims made in other studies (e.g. Runciman et al, 1996) that health visitors for older people may be of value in meeting the post-discharge needs of these people.

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More information

Published date: February 2000
Organisations: Bio-Behavioural Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360650
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360650
ISSN: 1462-4753
PURE UUID: 73e52c6e-686b-454a-909c-34e87a28a060
ORCID for J. Bridges: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6776-736X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Dec 2013 15:26
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:31

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