The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A developmental study of the interlimb coordination in running and galloping

A developmental study of the interlimb coordination in running and galloping
A developmental study of the interlimb coordination in running and galloping
Using a dynamical systems perspective on motor behavior, it was predicted that interlimb coordination of running and galloping would behave like coupled, nonlinear, limit-cycle oscillators, which show the properties of phase locking, entrainment, and structural stability. Female subjects ranging in age from 2.5 years to adult were filmed while running and galloping with and without a weight perturbation. Analysis of both temporal- and amplitude-phasing measures revealed that both gaits demonstrated oscillatory properties. Differences between gaits and across age were primarily a matter of degree. In general, children 4 years of age and below had slightly less stable phasing patterns, and all age groups showed slightly less stability in the gallop, particularly with amplitude phasing
0022-2895
409-428
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e

Whitall, Jill (1989) A developmental study of the interlimb coordination in running and galloping. Journal of Motor Behavior, 21 (4), 409-428. (doi:10.1080/00222895.1989.10735492).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using a dynamical systems perspective on motor behavior, it was predicted that interlimb coordination of running and galloping would behave like coupled, nonlinear, limit-cycle oscillators, which show the properties of phase locking, entrainment, and structural stability. Female subjects ranging in age from 2.5 years to adult were filmed while running and galloping with and without a weight perturbation. Analysis of both temporal- and amplitude-phasing measures revealed that both gaits demonstrated oscillatory properties. Differences between gaits and across age were primarily a matter of degree. In general, children 4 years of age and below had slightly less stable phasing patterns, and all age groups showed slightly less stability in the gallop, particularly with amplitude phasing

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1989
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360703
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360703
ISSN: 0022-2895
PURE UUID: 3b1a747b-8e76-4a9f-b216-c156b02215c0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2013 11:11
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:10

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jill Whitall

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×