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Coordination of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait

Coordination of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait
Coordination of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait
Most human gait forms assume symmetrical, alternating patterns of interlimb coordination (e.g., crawling, walking, running). Human galloping is a notable exception. In contrast to extensive information on galloping in animals, little is known about this gait in humans. Therefore, kinematic and topographical analyses of running and galloping were undertaken to investigate the manner in which the lower limbs are uncoupled to produce this asymmetrical gait. Seven adult females were filmed while running and galloping at their preferred speed. Analysis of the gaits revealed differences in the following: (a) preferred speed, (b) coupling between upper- and lower-limb girdles, and (c) point of foot fall (end-point trajectories). In contrast to clear differences in interlimb coordination, intralimb coordination was remarkably similar across gaits, although when galloping was adopted, the rear leg did show more variable change than the front leg
0022-2895
339-353
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Caldwell, Graham E.
eb06abbe-1221-4c2a-a210-e8b451663074
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Caldwell, Graham E.
eb06abbe-1221-4c2a-a210-e8b451663074

Whitall, Jill and Caldwell, Graham E. (1992) Coordination of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait. Journal of Motor Behavior, 24 (4), 339-353. (doi:10.1080/00222895.1992.9941630).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Most human gait forms assume symmetrical, alternating patterns of interlimb coordination (e.g., crawling, walking, running). Human galloping is a notable exception. In contrast to extensive information on galloping in animals, little is known about this gait in humans. Therefore, kinematic and topographical analyses of running and galloping were undertaken to investigate the manner in which the lower limbs are uncoupled to produce this asymmetrical gait. Seven adult females were filmed while running and galloping at their preferred speed. Analysis of the gaits revealed differences in the following: (a) preferred speed, (b) coupling between upper- and lower-limb girdles, and (c) point of foot fall (end-point trajectories). In contrast to clear differences in interlimb coordination, intralimb coordination was remarkably similar across gaits, although when galloping was adopted, the rear leg did show more variable change than the front leg

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More information

Published date: 1992
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360756
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360756
ISSN: 0022-2895
PURE UUID: afecbf70-ad43-41aa-89df-84c9b5e43e66

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Date deposited: 20 Dec 2013 09:11
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:09

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