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An energetic comparison of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait

An energetic comparison of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait
An energetic comparison of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait
This article contrasts the mechanical energy profiles of asymmetrical galloping with those of symmetrical running in adult humans. Seven female subjects were filmed while performing overground running and galloping at their preferred velocities. A previous study (Whitall & Caldwell, 1992) showed that kinematic differences between these gait modes included higher preferred velocity for running than galloping, with distinct differences in interlimb coordination but surprisingly similar intralimb patterns. Energetically, in the present study the whole body center of mass during galloping was found to behave much as it does in walking; kinetic and potential energy profiles were out of phase, as compared with running, which exhibited in-phase fluctuations of kinetic and potential energies. The primary reason for these center of mass differences was found in the energetics of the back leg of galloping, which demonstrated alterations in timing of its energy fluctuations and less energy generation than the front leg. Analysis of the power sources underlying the segmental energies during swing phase showed that the back leg's energy changes were accomplished mainly through reduced use of the hip muscles and less interlimb energy transfer. The back leg's energetics during swing also displayed a shift toward greater reliance on nonmuscular energy sources. A pattern of energy inflow during early swing and energy outflow during late swing was common to both running and galloping, although the galloping legs both demonstrated more abrupt transitions between these phases. The possibility is raised that the 67/33 interlimb phasing ratio used in galloping is selected to reduce mechanical energy variations of the total body center of mass. These data suggest that models of asymmetric gait in humans must account for more than merely phase alteration
0022-2895
139-154
Caldwell, Graham E.
eb06abbe-1221-4c2a-a210-e8b451663074
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Caldwell, Graham E.
eb06abbe-1221-4c2a-a210-e8b451663074
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e

Caldwell, Graham E. and Whitall, Jill (1995) An energetic comparison of symmetrical and asymmetrical human gait. Journal of Motor Behavior, 27 (2), 139-154. (doi:10.1080/00222895.1995.9941706).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article contrasts the mechanical energy profiles of asymmetrical galloping with those of symmetrical running in adult humans. Seven female subjects were filmed while performing overground running and galloping at their preferred velocities. A previous study (Whitall & Caldwell, 1992) showed that kinematic differences between these gait modes included higher preferred velocity for running than galloping, with distinct differences in interlimb coordination but surprisingly similar intralimb patterns. Energetically, in the present study the whole body center of mass during galloping was found to behave much as it does in walking; kinetic and potential energy profiles were out of phase, as compared with running, which exhibited in-phase fluctuations of kinetic and potential energies. The primary reason for these center of mass differences was found in the energetics of the back leg of galloping, which demonstrated alterations in timing of its energy fluctuations and less energy generation than the front leg. Analysis of the power sources underlying the segmental energies during swing phase showed that the back leg's energy changes were accomplished mainly through reduced use of the hip muscles and less interlimb energy transfer. The back leg's energetics during swing also displayed a shift toward greater reliance on nonmuscular energy sources. A pattern of energy inflow during early swing and energy outflow during late swing was common to both running and galloping, although the galloping legs both demonstrated more abrupt transitions between these phases. The possibility is raised that the 67/33 interlimb phasing ratio used in galloping is selected to reduce mechanical energy variations of the total body center of mass. These data suggest that models of asymmetric gait in humans must account for more than merely phase alteration

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Published date: 1995
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 360758
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360758
ISSN: 0022-2895
PURE UUID: f01a96fa-08aa-4b73-82fe-a73ebf289eb3

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Date deposited: 20 Dec 2013 10:19
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:09

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