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Isometric force regulation in children

Isometric force regulation in children
Isometric force regulation in children
Isometric pinch force regulation was investigated in children and adults using a visuo-motor tracking paradigm. Younger children (5-7 years) performed significantly worse than older children (9-11 years) and adults in terms of an overall error score as well as a correlation score, which is believed to reflect the ability to predict the target pattern. Older children had similar overall error scores to adults and were equal to them in terms of correlation scores by the fourth block of trials. A temporal (lag) measure indicated high variability in the youngest age group. An important finding was a cluster of young children whose maximum performance on the correlation measure was equal to that of older children and adults. The temporal (lag) measure indicated varying rates of acquisition of the subcomponents of this task in the youngest age group. In addition, interlimb transfer of learning was demonstrated in all age groups, reflecting the strong central component of this task
0022-0965
245-260
Lazarus, Jo-anne C.
4c4e8dfb-d2a9-4b10-b4b9-1014181b8550
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Franks, Catherine A.
c2363071-18dc-4878-8940-0c0bef591b9c
Lazarus, Jo-anne C.
4c4e8dfb-d2a9-4b10-b4b9-1014181b8550
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Franks, Catherine A.
c2363071-18dc-4878-8940-0c0bef591b9c

Lazarus, Jo-anne C., Whitall, Jill and Franks, Catherine A. (1995) Isometric force regulation in children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 60 (2), 245-260. (doi:10.1006/jecp.1995.1040).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Isometric pinch force regulation was investigated in children and adults using a visuo-motor tracking paradigm. Younger children (5-7 years) performed significantly worse than older children (9-11 years) and adults in terms of an overall error score as well as a correlation score, which is believed to reflect the ability to predict the target pattern. Older children had similar overall error scores to adults and were equal to them in terms of correlation scores by the fourth block of trials. A temporal (lag) measure indicated high variability in the youngest age group. An important finding was a cluster of young children whose maximum performance on the correlation measure was equal to that of older children and adults. The temporal (lag) measure indicated varying rates of acquisition of the subcomponents of this task in the youngest age group. In addition, interlimb transfer of learning was demonstrated in all age groups, reflecting the strong central component of this task

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Published date: October 1995
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360769
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360769
ISSN: 0022-0965
PURE UUID: c6822672-46c7-4023-88c4-e63710f11186

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Date deposited: 20 Dec 2013 14:25
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:09

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