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Nanotechnology for electrooptical and photovoltaic devices

Nanotechnology for electrooptical and photovoltaic devices
Nanotechnology for electrooptical and photovoltaic devices
Nanomaterials which provide one of the greatest potentials for improving performance and extended capabilities of products in a number of industrial sectors are a new class of materials, having dimensions in the 1~100?nm range. Nanostructures can be divided into zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and two-dimensional based on their shapes. The recent emphasis in the nanomaterials research is put on 1D nanostructures at the expense of 0D and 2D ones, perhaps due to the intriguing possibility of using them in a majority of short-term future applications. The most successful examples are seen in the microelectronics, where “smaller” has always meant a greater performance ever since the invention of transistors, for example, higher density of integration, faster response, lower cost, and less power consumption.

In recent years, optoelectronic and solar cells devices have been a highly developing field, due to the flexibility and light weight for energy conversion, which has the potential to be deployable. Therefore, the field of electrooptical and photovoltaic devices has been the subject of reviews. Electrooptical and photovoltaic devices are environmentally sustainable, in particular considering the availability of the nanostructured raw materials. Science and technology developments in electrooptical and photovoltaic devices over the next several years and their influence on the economics of electrooptical and PV installations are likely to establish which energy technologies become dominant for decades to come. The chance to share and discuss these crucial electrooptical and PV developments in a timely and influential forum is important.

This special issue selects 19 papers about dye-sensitized solar cells, small molecule organic solar cells, solar cell, thin-film solar cells, photovoltaic devices, and other related fields. This special issue enables interdisciplinary collaboration between science and engineering technologists in the academic and industrial fields.
1110-662X
p. 1
Meen, Teen-Hang
3442d34b-ce94-47b4-9c70-d0c40e085c60
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Ji, Liang-Wen
3f4d5ba2-a4a1-436a-a8e0-c7d4c167a5f7
Hsiao, Yu-Jen
59ccc584-8c1c-4e86-801b-e36759882d67
Meen, Teen-Hang
3442d34b-ce94-47b4-9c70-d0c40e085c60
Prior, Stephen D.
9c753e49-092a-4dc5-b4cd-6d5ff77e9ced
Ji, Liang-Wen
3f4d5ba2-a4a1-436a-a8e0-c7d4c167a5f7
Hsiao, Yu-Jen
59ccc584-8c1c-4e86-801b-e36759882d67

Meen, Teen-Hang, Prior, Stephen D., Ji, Liang-Wen and Hsiao, Yu-Jen (eds.) (2013) Nanotechnology for electrooptical and photovoltaic devices. International Journal of Photoenergy, 2013 (2013), p. 1. (doi:10.1155/2013/292485).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Nanomaterials which provide one of the greatest potentials for improving performance and extended capabilities of products in a number of industrial sectors are a new class of materials, having dimensions in the 1~100?nm range. Nanostructures can be divided into zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and two-dimensional based on their shapes. The recent emphasis in the nanomaterials research is put on 1D nanostructures at the expense of 0D and 2D ones, perhaps due to the intriguing possibility of using them in a majority of short-term future applications. The most successful examples are seen in the microelectronics, where “smaller” has always meant a greater performance ever since the invention of transistors, for example, higher density of integration, faster response, lower cost, and less power consumption.

In recent years, optoelectronic and solar cells devices have been a highly developing field, due to the flexibility and light weight for energy conversion, which has the potential to be deployable. Therefore, the field of electrooptical and photovoltaic devices has been the subject of reviews. Electrooptical and photovoltaic devices are environmentally sustainable, in particular considering the availability of the nanostructured raw materials. Science and technology developments in electrooptical and photovoltaic devices over the next several years and their influence on the economics of electrooptical and PV installations are likely to establish which energy technologies become dominant for decades to come. The chance to share and discuss these crucial electrooptical and PV developments in a timely and influential forum is important.

This special issue selects 19 papers about dye-sensitized solar cells, small molecule organic solar cells, solar cell, thin-film solar cells, photovoltaic devices, and other related fields. This special issue enables interdisciplinary collaboration between science and engineering technologists in the academic and industrial fields.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 December 2013
Organisations: Computational Engineering & Design Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360892
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360892
ISSN: 1110-662X
PURE UUID: 65f9a8fb-a533-4322-8f18-1f5b3f5b8c36
ORCID for Stephen D. Prior: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4993-4942

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jan 2014 11:25
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:40

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