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Adaptation to externally driven change: the impact of political change on job satisfaction in the public sector

Adaptation to externally driven change: the impact of political change on job satisfaction in the public sector
Adaptation to externally driven change: the impact of political change on job satisfaction in the public sector
This article uses a quasi-natural experiment to investigate the adaptation of job satisfaction to exogenously driven political change in the public sector. This is important because democratic government bureaucracies often experience changes in leadership after elections. Our analyses are based on data drawn from a large longitudinal dataset, the British Household Panel Survey. We find that the impact of political elections is largely weak and temporary, and is only present for men. For women the internal processes of the organization tend to be more important. These findings suggest that changes in political leadership may not be associated with fundamental changes in policy.
0033-3352
384-395
Tabvuma, Vurain
fd6049e2-1b7f-4d77-b74f-a910fab25603
Bui, Hong T.M.
5cec562e-5ca4-4b86-bd95-b122b2755629
Homberg, Fabian
31042a5c-cd37-46a1-bdde-53abb55f1072
Tabvuma, Vurain
fd6049e2-1b7f-4d77-b74f-a910fab25603
Bui, Hong T.M.
5cec562e-5ca4-4b86-bd95-b122b2755629
Homberg, Fabian
31042a5c-cd37-46a1-bdde-53abb55f1072

Tabvuma, Vurain, Bui, Hong T.M. and Homberg, Fabian (2014) Adaptation to externally driven change: the impact of political change on job satisfaction in the public sector. Public Administration Review, 74 (3), 384-395. (doi:10.1111/puar.12204).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article uses a quasi-natural experiment to investigate the adaptation of job satisfaction to exogenously driven political change in the public sector. This is important because democratic government bureaucracies often experience changes in leadership after elections. Our analyses are based on data drawn from a large longitudinal dataset, the British Household Panel Survey. We find that the impact of political elections is largely weak and temporary, and is only present for men. For women the internal processes of the organization tend to be more important. These findings suggest that changes in political leadership may not be associated with fundamental changes in policy.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 12 May 2014
Published date: May 2014
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360914
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360914
ISSN: 0033-3352
PURE UUID: b821c52f-6f99-4162-b881-6cefe4a75aa5

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Date deposited: 08 Jan 2014 17:22
Last modified: 16 Sep 2019 18:34

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Contributors

Author: Vurain Tabvuma
Author: Hong T.M. Bui
Author: Fabian Homberg

University divisions

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