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The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification

The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification
The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification
Coccolithophore blooms are significant contributors to the global production and export of calcium carbonate (calcite). The Patagonian Shelf is a site of intense annual coccolithophore blooms during austral summer. During December 2008, we made intensive measurements of the ecology, biogeochemistry, and physiology of a coccolithophore bloom. High numbers of Emiliania huxleyi cells and detached coccoliths (>1?×?103?mL?1 and >10?×?103?mL?1, respectively), high particulate inorganic carbon concentrations (>10?mmol C m?2), and high calcite production (up to 7.3?mmol C m?2 d?1) all characterized bloom waters. The bloom was dominated by the low-calcite-containing B/C morphotype of Emiliania huxleyi, although a small (<10?µm) Southern Ocean diatom of the genus Fragilariopsis was present in almost equal numbers (0.2–2?×?103?mL?1). Estimates of Fragilariopsis contributions to chlorophyll, phytoplankton carbon, and primary production were >30%, similar to estimates for E. huxleyi and indicative of a significant role for this diatom in bloom biogeochemistry. Cell-normalized calcification rates, when corrected for a high number of nonactive cells, were relatively high and when normalized to estimates of coccolith calcite indicate excessive coccolith production in the declining phase of the bloom. We find that low measures of calcite and calcite production relative to other blooms in the global ocean indicate that the dominance of the B/C morphotype may lead to overall lower calcite production. Globally, this suggests that morphotype composition influences regional bloom inventories of carbonate production and export and that climate-induced changes in morphotype biogeography could affect the carbon cycle.
0886-6236
1023-1033
Poulton, Alex J.
14bf64a7-d617-4913-b882-e8495543e717
Painter, Stuart C.
29e32f35-4ee8-4654-b305-4dbe5a312295
Young, Jeremy R.
18d63549-d248-4012-91b1-64382581ef53
Bates, Nicholas R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Bowler, Bruce
39b44744-ec15-455d-8ff6-18f15807ce70
Drapeau, Dave
6e00f5a4-f68c-4267-bfde-401daa7e7e63
Lyczsckowski, Emily
874b1a0c-e737-43e2-98ce-7aa95070dbbb
Balch, William M.
18270567-fc45-4bc9-bd82-253d473e9564
Poulton, Alex J.
14bf64a7-d617-4913-b882-e8495543e717
Painter, Stuart C.
29e32f35-4ee8-4654-b305-4dbe5a312295
Young, Jeremy R.
18d63549-d248-4012-91b1-64382581ef53
Bates, Nicholas R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Bowler, Bruce
39b44744-ec15-455d-8ff6-18f15807ce70
Drapeau, Dave
6e00f5a4-f68c-4267-bfde-401daa7e7e63
Lyczsckowski, Emily
874b1a0c-e737-43e2-98ce-7aa95070dbbb
Balch, William M.
18270567-fc45-4bc9-bd82-253d473e9564

Poulton, Alex J., Painter, Stuart C., Young, Jeremy R., Bates, Nicholas R., Bowler, Bruce, Drapeau, Dave, Lyczsckowski, Emily and Balch, William M. (2013) The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 27 (4), 1023-1033. (doi:10.1002/2013GB004641).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Coccolithophore blooms are significant contributors to the global production and export of calcium carbonate (calcite). The Patagonian Shelf is a site of intense annual coccolithophore blooms during austral summer. During December 2008, we made intensive measurements of the ecology, biogeochemistry, and physiology of a coccolithophore bloom. High numbers of Emiliania huxleyi cells and detached coccoliths (>1?×?103?mL?1 and >10?×?103?mL?1, respectively), high particulate inorganic carbon concentrations (>10?mmol C m?2), and high calcite production (up to 7.3?mmol C m?2 d?1) all characterized bloom waters. The bloom was dominated by the low-calcite-containing B/C morphotype of Emiliania huxleyi, although a small (<10?µm) Southern Ocean diatom of the genus Fragilariopsis was present in almost equal numbers (0.2–2?×?103?mL?1). Estimates of Fragilariopsis contributions to chlorophyll, phytoplankton carbon, and primary production were >30%, similar to estimates for E. huxleyi and indicative of a significant role for this diatom in bloom biogeochemistry. Cell-normalized calcification rates, when corrected for a high number of nonactive cells, were relatively high and when normalized to estimates of coccolith calcite indicate excessive coccolith production in the declining phase of the bloom. We find that low measures of calcite and calcite production relative to other blooms in the global ocean indicate that the dominance of the B/C morphotype may lead to overall lower calcite production. Globally, this suggests that morphotype composition influences regional bloom inventories of carbonate production and export and that climate-induced changes in morphotype biogeography could affect the carbon cycle.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: October 2013
Published date: December 2013
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Marine Biogeochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 360997
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/360997
ISSN: 0886-6236
PURE UUID: 53b89822-fda7-458c-b2f5-283c9e4cf58e

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Date deposited: 09 Jan 2014 16:04
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 03:05

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Contributors

Author: Alex J. Poulton
Author: Stuart C. Painter
Author: Jeremy R. Young
Author: Bruce Bowler
Author: Dave Drapeau
Author: Emily Lyczsckowski
Author: William M. Balch

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