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Hierarchical bioimaging and quantification of vasculature in disease models using corrosion casts and microcomputed tomography

Hierarchical bioimaging and quantification of vasculature in disease models using corrosion casts and microcomputed tomography
Hierarchical bioimaging and quantification of vasculature in disease models using corrosion casts and microcomputed tomography
A wide range of disorders are associated with alterations of the central and peripheral vascular system. Modified vascular corrosion casting using a newly developed polymer, allows for the first time hierarchical assessment of 3D vessel data in animals down to the level of capillaries. Imaging of large volumes of vasculature at intermediate resolution (16 um) was performed using a desktop micro-computed tomography system. Subsequently regions of interest were identified for additional high resolution imaging (1.4 um) at the X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (XTM) station of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A framework for systematic hierarchical imaging and quantification was developed. Issues addressed included enhanced XTM data acquisition, introduction of local tomography, sample navigation, advanced post processing, and data combination. In addition to visual assessment of qualitative changes, morphometrical and architectural indices were determined using direct 3D morphometry software developed in house. Vessel specific parameters included thickness, surface, connectivity, and vessel length. Reconstructions of cerebral vasculature in mutant mice modeling Alzheimer's disease revealed significant changes in vessel architecture and morphology. In the future, a combination of these techniques may support drug discovery. Additionally, future ultra-high-resolution in vivo systems may even allow non-invasive tracking of temporal alterations in vascular morphology.
0277-786X
65-76
Heinzer, Stefan
629f6945-8890-43d3-994e-ef770af6eb16
Krucker, Thomas
c2e8925b-2bdc-4d43-bc81-a0d8aadb97b8
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Abela, Rafael
32050843-84a9-496b-bf7a-eb495e6a71df
Meyer, Eric P.
65dc42a1-c00f-4546-b5f9-c3aa7eba0aab
Schuler, Alexandra
b60091b4-25ab-45ca-b9f1-e0f3cd9aaf06
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Bonse, Ulrich
0ed37e40-03f2-4a26-aa8c-6959f6c18259
Bonse, Ulrich
0ed37e40-03f2-4a26-aa8c-6959f6c18259
Heinzer, Stefan
629f6945-8890-43d3-994e-ef770af6eb16
Krucker, Thomas
c2e8925b-2bdc-4d43-bc81-a0d8aadb97b8
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Abela, Rafael
32050843-84a9-496b-bf7a-eb495e6a71df
Meyer, Eric P.
65dc42a1-c00f-4546-b5f9-c3aa7eba0aab
Schuler, Alexandra
b60091b4-25ab-45ca-b9f1-e0f3cd9aaf06
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036

Heinzer, Stefan, Krucker, Thomas, Stampanoni, Marco, Abela, Rafael, Meyer, Eric P., Schuler, Alexandra, Schneider, Philipp and Müller, Ralph , Bonse, Ulrich (ed.) (2004) Hierarchical bioimaging and quantification of vasculature in disease models using corrosion casts and microcomputed tomography. [in special issue: Developments in X-Ray Tomography IV] Proceedings of SPIE, 5535, 65-76. (doi:10.1117/12.559514).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A wide range of disorders are associated with alterations of the central and peripheral vascular system. Modified vascular corrosion casting using a newly developed polymer, allows for the first time hierarchical assessment of 3D vessel data in animals down to the level of capillaries. Imaging of large volumes of vasculature at intermediate resolution (16 um) was performed using a desktop micro-computed tomography system. Subsequently regions of interest were identified for additional high resolution imaging (1.4 um) at the X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (XTM) station of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A framework for systematic hierarchical imaging and quantification was developed. Issues addressed included enhanced XTM data acquisition, introduction of local tomography, sample navigation, advanced post processing, and data combination. In addition to visual assessment of qualitative changes, morphometrical and architectural indices were determined using direct 3D morphometry software developed in house. Vessel specific parameters included thickness, surface, connectivity, and vessel length. Reconstructions of cerebral vasculature in mutant mice modeling Alzheimer's disease revealed significant changes in vessel architecture and morphology. In the future, a combination of these techniques may support drug discovery. Additionally, future ultra-high-resolution in vivo systems may even allow non-invasive tracking of temporal alterations in vascular morphology.

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More information

Published date: 26 October 2004
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361053
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361053
ISSN: 0277-786X
PURE UUID: 3ec04f93-567d-4910-b547-6ad7c5fb08fc
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2014 11:57
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:35

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Contributors

Editor: Ulrich Bonse
Author: Stefan Heinzer
Author: Thomas Krucker
Author: Marco Stampanoni
Author: Rafael Abela
Author: Eric P. Meyer
Author: Alexandra Schuler
Author: Ralph Müller

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