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Hierarchical microimaging for multiscale analysis of large vascular networks

Hierarchical microimaging for multiscale analysis of large vascular networks
Hierarchical microimaging for multiscale analysis of large vascular networks
There is a wide range of diseases and normal physiological processes that are associated with alterations of the vascular system in organs. Ex vivo imaging of large vascular networks became feasible with recent developments in microcomputed tomography (µCT). Current methods permit to visualize only limited numbers of physically excised regions of interests (ROIs) from larger samples. We developed a method based on modified vascular corrosion casting (VCC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and desktop and synchrotron radiation µCT (SRµCT) technologies to image vasculature at increasing levels of resolution, also referred to as hierarchical imaging. This novel approach allows nondestructive 3D visualization and quantification of large microvascular networks, while retaining a precise anatomical context for ROIs scanned at very high resolution. Scans of entire mouse brain VCCs were performed at 16-µm resolution with a desktop µCT system. Custom-made navigation software with a ROI selection tool enabled the identification of anatomical brain structures and precise placement of multiple ROIs. These were then scanned at 1.4-µm voxel size using SRµCT and a local tomography setup. A framework was developed for fast sample positioning, precise selection of ROIs, and sequential high-throughput scanning of a large numbers of brain VCCs. Despite the use of local tomography, exceptional image quality was achieved with SRµCT. This method enables qualitative and quantitative assessment of vasculature at unprecedented resolution and volume with relatively high throughput, opening new possibilities to study vessel architecture and vascular alterations in models of disease.
626-636
Heinzer, Stefan
629f6945-8890-43d3-994e-ef770af6eb16
Krucker, Thomas
c2e8925b-2bdc-4d43-bc81-a0d8aadb97b8
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Abela, Rafael
32050843-84a9-496b-bf7a-eb495e6a71df
Meyer, Eric P.
65dc42a1-c00f-4546-b5f9-c3aa7eba0aab
Schuler, Alexandra
b60091b4-25ab-45ca-b9f1-e0f3cd9aaf06
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Heinzer, Stefan
629f6945-8890-43d3-994e-ef770af6eb16
Krucker, Thomas
c2e8925b-2bdc-4d43-bc81-a0d8aadb97b8
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Abela, Rafael
32050843-84a9-496b-bf7a-eb495e6a71df
Meyer, Eric P.
65dc42a1-c00f-4546-b5f9-c3aa7eba0aab
Schuler, Alexandra
b60091b4-25ab-45ca-b9f1-e0f3cd9aaf06
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036

Heinzer, Stefan, Krucker, Thomas, Stampanoni, Marco, Abela, Rafael, Meyer, Eric P., Schuler, Alexandra, Schneider, Philipp and Müller, Ralph (2006) Hierarchical microimaging for multiscale analysis of large vascular networks. NeuroImage, 32 (2), 626-636. (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.03.043).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is a wide range of diseases and normal physiological processes that are associated with alterations of the vascular system in organs. Ex vivo imaging of large vascular networks became feasible with recent developments in microcomputed tomography (µCT). Current methods permit to visualize only limited numbers of physically excised regions of interests (ROIs) from larger samples. We developed a method based on modified vascular corrosion casting (VCC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and desktop and synchrotron radiation µCT (SRµCT) technologies to image vasculature at increasing levels of resolution, also referred to as hierarchical imaging. This novel approach allows nondestructive 3D visualization and quantification of large microvascular networks, while retaining a precise anatomical context for ROIs scanned at very high resolution. Scans of entire mouse brain VCCs were performed at 16-µm resolution with a desktop µCT system. Custom-made navigation software with a ROI selection tool enabled the identification of anatomical brain structures and precise placement of multiple ROIs. These were then scanned at 1.4-µm voxel size using SRµCT and a local tomography setup. A framework was developed for fast sample positioning, precise selection of ROIs, and sequential high-throughput scanning of a large numbers of brain VCCs. Despite the use of local tomography, exceptional image quality was achieved with SRµCT. This method enables qualitative and quantitative assessment of vasculature at unprecedented resolution and volume with relatively high throughput, opening new possibilities to study vessel architecture and vascular alterations in models of disease.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 May 2006
Published date: 15 August 2006
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361055
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361055
PURE UUID: 406d7080-038a-446d-a259-429ea7239018
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jan 2014 12:28
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:34

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Contributors

Author: Stefan Heinzer
Author: Thomas Krucker
Author: Marco Stampanoni
Author: Rafael Abela
Author: Eric P. Meyer
Author: Alexandra Schuler
Author: Ralph Müller

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