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The importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics

The importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics
The importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics
As shown by recent data bone strength estimation can greatly be improved by including microarchitectural parameters in the analysis. Our previous results showed that intracortical canals (the living space of the vasculature and/or remodeling units) are a major contributor to cortical tissue porosity, and therefore, can be linked to mechanical bone properties. Consequently, the goal of this study was to investigate the importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics. To study intracortical canals within murine femoral bone, we used a mouse model, including two mouse strains, C57BL/6J-Ghrhr(lit)/J (B6-lit/+) and C3.B6-Ghrhr(lit)/J (C3.B6-lit/+) representing low and high bone mass, respectively. The intracortical canal network was assessed by synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography and the mechanical bone properties were derived from three-point bending experiments. Multiple linear regression models were built to explain the variation in ultimate force, work to fracture, and stiffness in terms of the morphometric parameters. The power to explain the variation in bone mechanics was increased significantly for most mechanical measures when including morphometric parameters of intracortical canals in addition to macroscopic morphometric measures. Specifically, we could derive generalized (mouse strain-independent) models for ultimate force, where the incorporation of intracortical canals in addition to macroscopic bone measures improved the explained variation in ultimate force considerably, which was confirmed by an increase in adjusted R2 of 73% and 8% for B6-lit/+ and C3.B6-lit/+, respectively. Further, we observed that the heterogeneity of the morphometric measures for the individual canal branches play an important role for explaining the variation in ultimate force. Finally, the current study provides strong evidence that work to fracture of murine bone, which is triggered critically by microcracks, is affected by intracortical canals. In summary, the study suggests that the intracortical canal network is important for bone mechanics.
cortical bone, canal network, ?CT, synchrotron radiation, biomechanics, ultimate force, work to fracture
8756-3282
120-128
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Voide, Romain
8859d4cc-c065-4034-b350-0538997ce8fe
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Donahue, Leah Rae
a3e059f6-5339-43e1-89cc-5d8af96e800b
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Voide, Romain
8859d4cc-c065-4034-b350-0538997ce8fe
Stampanoni, Marco
bfedb3b0-01e8-4e1b-9163-41295b4ceeb1
Donahue, Leah Rae
a3e059f6-5339-43e1-89cc-5d8af96e800b
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036

Schneider, Philipp, Voide, Romain, Stampanoni, Marco, Donahue, Leah Rae and Müller, Ralph (2013) The importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics Bone, 53, (1), pp. 120-128. (doi:10.1016/j.bone.2012.11.024).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As shown by recent data bone strength estimation can greatly be improved by including microarchitectural parameters in the analysis. Our previous results showed that intracortical canals (the living space of the vasculature and/or remodeling units) are a major contributor to cortical tissue porosity, and therefore, can be linked to mechanical bone properties. Consequently, the goal of this study was to investigate the importance of the intracortical canal network for murine bone mechanics. To study intracortical canals within murine femoral bone, we used a mouse model, including two mouse strains, C57BL/6J-Ghrhr(lit)/J (B6-lit/+) and C3.B6-Ghrhr(lit)/J (C3.B6-lit/+) representing low and high bone mass, respectively. The intracortical canal network was assessed by synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography and the mechanical bone properties were derived from three-point bending experiments. Multiple linear regression models were built to explain the variation in ultimate force, work to fracture, and stiffness in terms of the morphometric parameters. The power to explain the variation in bone mechanics was increased significantly for most mechanical measures when including morphometric parameters of intracortical canals in addition to macroscopic morphometric measures. Specifically, we could derive generalized (mouse strain-independent) models for ultimate force, where the incorporation of intracortical canals in addition to macroscopic bone measures improved the explained variation in ultimate force considerably, which was confirmed by an increase in adjusted R2 of 73% and 8% for B6-lit/+ and C3.B6-lit/+, respectively. Further, we observed that the heterogeneity of the morphometric measures for the individual canal branches play an important role for explaining the variation in ultimate force. Finally, the current study provides strong evidence that work to fracture of murine bone, which is triggered critically by microcracks, is affected by intracortical canals. In summary, the study suggests that the intracortical canal network is important for bone mechanics.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 3 December 2012
Published date: March 2013
Keywords: cortical bone, canal network, ?CT, synchrotron radiation, biomechanics, ultimate force, work to fracture
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361074
ISSN: 8756-3282
PURE UUID: b130984a-934c-4155-bf32-beb6e667f53a
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2014 16:45
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:07

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Contributors

Author: Romain Voide
Author: Marco Stampanoni
Author: Leah Rae Donahue
Author: Ralph Müller

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