The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Changing patterns of parking search

Changing patterns of parking search
Changing patterns of parking search
It has long been understood in car parking behavioural research that sociological, psychological and practical factors determine where a motorist parks and when they decide to do so. Empirical studies from the 1980s suggested that motorists then adopted a series of strategies when seeking the most suitable space closest to their destination and psychologists have suggested that this was predominantly actioned from the unconscious (i.e. habit). Over the last thirty years however society has seen a revolution in communications technology, information availability and general travel behaviour and therefore these views on motorist behaviour when searching for a parking space may no longer be valid.

To assess this, a survey of motorists was undertaken in 2013 in Brighton and Hove to determine whether the patterns identified in the 1980’s data are still in use today and how strategies (if any) of motorists vary according to their socio-demographic characteristics. Key findings include that while motorists still usually head for the same car park initially, there is now often a much clearer back-up strategy if unsuccessful; this may involve cruising (where vehicles seem to be driving around with little purpose), but this is not as random as identified in previous research. Motorists also revealed strong optimism tendencies and often cynical views about real-time parking information.

Eight distinct psychographic groups were extracted through cluster analysis, with each group representing a unique combination of preferences, worldviews and attitudes, indicating that different groups may need to be targeted in different ways to optimise the chance of influencing parking behaviour. It is clear from the data that the same parking behaviour can take place for different reasons and that the same attitudes can lead to different behaviours. The implications of this are that local authorities may need to rethink their strategies to best influence motorist parking behaviour.
Charles, Chris
2b953710-03f2-48f8-962c-bc65f774e606
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Charles, Chris
2b953710-03f2-48f8-962c-bc65f774e606
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286

Charles, Chris and Waterson, Ben (2014) Changing patterns of parking search. 46th Annual Conference of the Universities' Transport Study Group. 06 - 08 Jan 2014.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

It has long been understood in car parking behavioural research that sociological, psychological and practical factors determine where a motorist parks and when they decide to do so. Empirical studies from the 1980s suggested that motorists then adopted a series of strategies when seeking the most suitable space closest to their destination and psychologists have suggested that this was predominantly actioned from the unconscious (i.e. habit). Over the last thirty years however society has seen a revolution in communications technology, information availability and general travel behaviour and therefore these views on motorist behaviour when searching for a parking space may no longer be valid.

To assess this, a survey of motorists was undertaken in 2013 in Brighton and Hove to determine whether the patterns identified in the 1980’s data are still in use today and how strategies (if any) of motorists vary according to their socio-demographic characteristics. Key findings include that while motorists still usually head for the same car park initially, there is now often a much clearer back-up strategy if unsuccessful; this may involve cruising (where vehicles seem to be driving around with little purpose), but this is not as random as identified in previous research. Motorists also revealed strong optimism tendencies and often cynical views about real-time parking information.

Eight distinct psychographic groups were extracted through cluster analysis, with each group representing a unique combination of preferences, worldviews and attitudes, indicating that different groups may need to be targeted in different ways to optimise the chance of influencing parking behaviour. It is clear from the data that the same parking behaviour can take place for different reasons and that the same attitudes can lead to different behaviours. The implications of this are that local authorities may need to rethink their strategies to best influence motorist parking behaviour.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 2014
Venue - Dates: 46th Annual Conference of the Universities' Transport Study Group, 2014-01-06 - 2014-01-08
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361082
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361082
PURE UUID: 768b419f-8c62-4142-af7e-df72f1ecc3f1
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2014 11:44
Last modified: 10 Jul 2020 00:26

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×