The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Selecting low carbon technologies for heavy goods vehicles: a case study in the UK fast food supply chain

Selecting low carbon technologies for heavy goods vehicles: a case study in the UK fast food supply chain
Selecting low carbon technologies for heavy goods vehicles: a case study in the UK fast food supply chain
The fast food supply chain is facing increased operating costs due to rising food and energy prices. Based on a case study of a major fast food logistics operator, this paper uses a metaheuristic evolutionary algorithm to find the optimal combination of low carbon vehicle, powertrain and transport refrigeration technologies that minimise net present costs for a heterogeneous fleet of heavy goods vehicles operating in the chilled and frozen food sector.

Based on the financial and operational constraints of the live case study, the model suggests that rigid trucks should include spray reduction mud-flaps, new generation single-wide tyres, light weighting materials and flywheels. Depending on the duty cycle and fuel used, other additional technologies can further enhance the net present savings. Conventional diesel vehicles can reduce their net present costs by 10.25% and 11.43% in urban and regional duty cycles.

The model suggested that alternative refrigeration technologies had less potential for reducing costs unless working more than 10 hours per day; however they could make a considerable contribution to lower carbon emissions. As fast food logistic operators have access to used cooking oil, they can buy cheaper biodiesel while reducing GHG emissions by up to 84%. When comparing a conventional powered rigid truck using DERV with one using B65, cost savings were estimated to be £32,000 for urban duty cycles and over £42,000 for regional duty cycles per truck over their 5 year lifespans, reducing their CO2 by 231 and 273 tonnes respectively.
Velazquez Abad, Anthony
da7e985d-f164-43ff-8a51-8103c70b2dbe
Cherrett, Tom
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Velazquez Abad, Anthony
da7e985d-f164-43ff-8a51-8103c70b2dbe
Cherrett, Tom
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286

Velazquez Abad, Anthony, Cherrett, Tom and Waterson, Ben (2014) Selecting low carbon technologies for heavy goods vehicles: a case study in the UK fast food supply chain. 93rd Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, United States. 12 - 16 Jan 2014. 16 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The fast food supply chain is facing increased operating costs due to rising food and energy prices. Based on a case study of a major fast food logistics operator, this paper uses a metaheuristic evolutionary algorithm to find the optimal combination of low carbon vehicle, powertrain and transport refrigeration technologies that minimise net present costs for a heterogeneous fleet of heavy goods vehicles operating in the chilled and frozen food sector.

Based on the financial and operational constraints of the live case study, the model suggests that rigid trucks should include spray reduction mud-flaps, new generation single-wide tyres, light weighting materials and flywheels. Depending on the duty cycle and fuel used, other additional technologies can further enhance the net present savings. Conventional diesel vehicles can reduce their net present costs by 10.25% and 11.43% in urban and regional duty cycles.

The model suggested that alternative refrigeration technologies had less potential for reducing costs unless working more than 10 hours per day; however they could make a considerable contribution to lower carbon emissions. As fast food logistic operators have access to used cooking oil, they can buy cheaper biodiesel while reducing GHG emissions by up to 84%. When comparing a conventional powered rigid truck using DERV with one using B65, cost savings were estimated to be £32,000 for urban duty cycles and over £42,000 for regional duty cycles per truck over their 5 year lifespans, reducing their CO2 by 231 and 273 tonnes respectively.

Text
2014 [75] Low Carbon HGVs TRB.pdf - Other
Download (590kB)

More information

Published date: January 2014
Venue - Dates: 93rd Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, United States, 2014-01-12 - 2014-01-16
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361085
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361085
PURE UUID: 499768f6-9ec9-4e0c-9da6-70d036d14835
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Jan 2014 13:12
Last modified: 10 Jul 2020 00:26

Export record

Contributors

Author: Anthony Velazquez Abad
Author: Tom Cherrett
Author: Ben Waterson ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×