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Developmental and evolutionary implications of cold shock effects in the speckled wood butterfly

Developmental and evolutionary implications of cold shock effects in the speckled wood butterfly
Developmental and evolutionary implications of cold shock effects in the speckled wood butterfly
The effects of pupal cold shock on the life cycle and wing morphology of the Speckled Wood butterfly are examined and their genetic assimilation is investigated. Metamorphosis is modelled in terms of changes in stability, and the mediation of cold shock effects by hormones is considered. Current theories of pattern formation are evaluated for the species, and pattern is analysed using manual, photographic and digital methods. The development of wing morphology is modelled, and cold shock effects understood by comparison with normal development. Developmental canalisation is estimated as variability and fluctuating asymmetry. An index is developed that predicts the extent of assimilation. Likely modes of inheritance are suggested, and the possibility of natural cold shock and assimilation in the species is considered. Recent trends in biology indicate that neo-Darwinian concepts cannot adequately account for certain developmental and hereditary phenomena and that a new paradigm is emerging. The two schools are compared with particular reference to Weismann and Waddington, and the phenomenology is re-examined in the light of the new findings.
Winokur, Leonard
41292d29-11e3-482c-b501-2349bff7ff18
Winokur, Leonard
41292d29-11e3-482c-b501-2349bff7ff18
White, Richard J.
b259b543-0cd6-475c-b31e-f2434b69c798

(1989) Developmental and evolutionary implications of cold shock effects in the speckled wood butterfly. University of Southampton, Biology, Doctoral Thesis, 501pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The effects of pupal cold shock on the life cycle and wing morphology of the Speckled Wood butterfly are examined and their genetic assimilation is investigated. Metamorphosis is modelled in terms of changes in stability, and the mediation of cold shock effects by hormones is considered. Current theories of pattern formation are evaluated for the species, and pattern is analysed using manual, photographic and digital methods. The development of wing morphology is modelled, and cold shock effects understood by comparison with normal development. Developmental canalisation is estimated as variability and fluctuating asymmetry. An index is developed that predicts the extent of assimilation. Likely modes of inheritance are suggested, and the possibility of natural cold shock and assimilation in the species is considered. Recent trends in biology indicate that neo-Darwinian concepts cannot adequately account for certain developmental and hereditary phenomena and that a new paradigm is emerging. The two schools are compared with particular reference to Weismann and Waddington, and the phenomenology is re-examined in the light of the new findings.

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Published date: 1989
Organisations: University of Southampton, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361169
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361169
PURE UUID: 8268bec7-3d74-44ff-9d8f-181f98037445

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2014 15:10
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:06

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