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More rapid and severe disease outbreaks for aquaculture at the tropics: implications for food security

More rapid and severe disease outbreaks for aquaculture at the tropics: implications for food security
More rapid and severe disease outbreaks for aquaculture at the tropics: implications for food security
Aquaculture is replacing capture fisheries in supplying the world with dietary protein. Although disease is a major threat to aquaculture production, the underlying global epidemiological patterns are unknown.

We analysed disease outbreak severity across different latitudes in a diverse range of aquaculture systems.

Disease at lower latitudes progresses more rapidly and results in higher cumulative mortality, in particular at early stages of development and in shellfish.

Tropical countries suffer proportionally greater losses in aquaculture during disease outbreaks and have less time to mitigate losses.

Synthesis and applications. Disease can present a major problem for food production and security in equatorial regions where fish and shellfish provide a major source of dietary protein. As the incidences of some infectious diseases may increase with climate change, adaptation strategies must consider global patterns in disease vulnerability of aquaculture and develop options to minimize impacts on food production.

climate change adaptation, disease, epidemiology, epizootics, latitudinal trend
215-222
Leung, Tommy L.F.
979529d8-35f0-46fd-8d73-588181132685
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Dulvy, Nick
215f8d71-7164-4929-8b1c-25a7ca26098b
Leung, Tommy L.F.
979529d8-35f0-46fd-8d73-588181132685
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Dulvy, Nick
215f8d71-7164-4929-8b1c-25a7ca26098b

Leung, Tommy L.F., Bates, Amanda E. and Dulvy, Nick (2013) More rapid and severe disease outbreaks for aquaculture at the tropics: implications for food security. Journal of Applied Ecology, 50 (1), 215-222. (doi:10.1111/1365-2644.12017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aquaculture is replacing capture fisheries in supplying the world with dietary protein. Although disease is a major threat to aquaculture production, the underlying global epidemiological patterns are unknown.

We analysed disease outbreak severity across different latitudes in a diverse range of aquaculture systems.

Disease at lower latitudes progresses more rapidly and results in higher cumulative mortality, in particular at early stages of development and in shellfish.

Tropical countries suffer proportionally greater losses in aquaculture during disease outbreaks and have less time to mitigate losses.

Synthesis and applications. Disease can present a major problem for food production and security in equatorial regions where fish and shellfish provide a major source of dietary protein. As the incidences of some infectious diseases may increase with climate change, adaptation strategies must consider global patterns in disease vulnerability of aquaculture and develop options to minimize impacts on food production.

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Leung and Bates 2012.pdf - Version of Record
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Published date: February 2013
Keywords: climate change adaptation, disease, epidemiology, epizootics, latitudinal trend
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 361223
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361223
PURE UUID: 3f1b354e-7862-4ff0-80f5-b1b5743ea441

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Date deposited: 15 Jan 2014 14:03
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 05:13

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Contributors

Author: Tommy L.F. Leung
Author: Amanda E. Bates
Author: Nick Dulvy

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