The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Distribution patterns of zoochlorellae and zooxanthellae hosted by two Pacific Northeast anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica

Distribution patterns of zoochlorellae and zooxanthellae hosted by two Pacific Northeast anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica
Distribution patterns of zoochlorellae and zooxanthellae hosted by two Pacific Northeast anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica
This study investigated patterns in the relative abundance of two photosynthetic algal symbionts, zoochlorellae (ZC) and zooxanthellae (ZX), hosted by two temperate anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica. Previous studies have documented varying proportions of each symbiont along environmental gradients, presumably determined by their respective physiological capabilities. To test for differences in the algal type between the two host species, we sampled anemone tissues (tentacle or tentacle and body column) of similarly sized polyps that were located close together in multiple habitats: tidepools, crevices, underneath rock ledges, and along natural light gradients in caves. The ZC-A. elegantissima symbiosis was rare on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Even in low-irradiance habitats, ZC were the dominant algae hosted by A. xanthogrammica, while nearby A. elegantissima hosted ZX or was algae-free. As a first step in determining whether symbiont growth rates differed between the two host species, we quantified mitotic index (MI), the percentage of cells with division furrows, under artificial light and in the field by simultaneously sampling tentacles from both species. MI was more stable in A. elegantissima: the MI of ZX isolated from the tentacles of A. xanthogrammica was slightly higher at a light level of 80 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) than it was for ZX from A. elegantissima (respectively, 7.3 vs. 6.2) and relatively lower at 40 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) (3.9 vs. 5.6). Our data indicate host-specific differences in symbiont distributions and MI when extrinsic physical parameters were similar.
0006-3185
237-247
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
McLean, Lily
3b0e2d6e-c507-446a-bff3-ec3ee169f53b
Laing, Patrick
4a66b3ff-6f10-4217-a47d-c53753b31263
Raeburn, Lisa A.
93ffc287-ee9d-45ea-82fd-848401cf12fe
Hare, Crystal
0eacd11a-5cdf-4c5b-89f5-e9831cb788a6
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
McLean, Lily
3b0e2d6e-c507-446a-bff3-ec3ee169f53b
Laing, Patrick
4a66b3ff-6f10-4217-a47d-c53753b31263
Raeburn, Lisa A.
93ffc287-ee9d-45ea-82fd-848401cf12fe
Hare, Crystal
0eacd11a-5cdf-4c5b-89f5-e9831cb788a6

Bates, Amanda E., McLean, Lily, Laing, Patrick, Raeburn, Lisa A. and Hare, Crystal (2010) Distribution patterns of zoochlorellae and zooxanthellae hosted by two Pacific Northeast anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica. Biological Bulletin, 218 (3), 237-247. (PMID:20570847)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study investigated patterns in the relative abundance of two photosynthetic algal symbionts, zoochlorellae (ZC) and zooxanthellae (ZX), hosted by two temperate anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and A. xanthogrammica. Previous studies have documented varying proportions of each symbiont along environmental gradients, presumably determined by their respective physiological capabilities. To test for differences in the algal type between the two host species, we sampled anemone tissues (tentacle or tentacle and body column) of similarly sized polyps that were located close together in multiple habitats: tidepools, crevices, underneath rock ledges, and along natural light gradients in caves. The ZC-A. elegantissima symbiosis was rare on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Even in low-irradiance habitats, ZC were the dominant algae hosted by A. xanthogrammica, while nearby A. elegantissima hosted ZX or was algae-free. As a first step in determining whether symbiont growth rates differed between the two host species, we quantified mitotic index (MI), the percentage of cells with division furrows, under artificial light and in the field by simultaneously sampling tentacles from both species. MI was more stable in A. elegantissima: the MI of ZX isolated from the tentacles of A. xanthogrammica was slightly higher at a light level of 80 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) than it was for ZX from A. elegantissima (respectively, 7.3 vs. 6.2) and relatively lower at 40 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) (3.9 vs. 5.6). Our data indicate host-specific differences in symbiont distributions and MI when extrinsic physical parameters were similar.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: June 2010
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361234
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361234
ISSN: 0006-3185
PURE UUID: f67668d6-1976-4e2f-8f2d-44a0e28499e4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2014 14:50
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:14

Export record

Contributors

Author: Amanda E. Bates
Author: Lily McLean
Author: Patrick Laing
Author: Lisa A. Raeburn
Author: Crystal Hare

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×