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Size discrimination of transient sounds: perception and modelling

Size discrimination of transient sounds: perception and modelling
Size discrimination of transient sounds: perception and modelling
Humans are able to get an impression of the size of an object by hearing it resonate. While this ability is well described for periodic speech sounds we investigate here the ability to discriminate the size of non-periodic transient impact sounds. Three experiments were performed on normal listeners (n=19) to investigate the importance of the spectral cue in different frequency regions. Recordings from pulse resonance sounds made by a metal ball hitting polystyrene spheres of 5 different sizes were used in the experiments. Recordings were manipulated in order to show that the same cues used in speaker size discrimination are used for transient signals. Results show that the most prominent resonances are the most important cue, but frequencies above 8 kHz also contribute. The results are explained by physiologically inspired model of size discrimination that is based on the Auditory Image Model, and its key part is the Mellin transform. The model can predict which of two objects is bigger. We conclude that similar cues that are used for speaker size discrimination are important for transient sounds
2083-389x
OA32-OA44
O'Meara, N.
d3e58192-ac77-4497-a2d6-d3e7f2a1af89
Bleeck, S.
c888ccba-e64c-47bf-b8fa-a687e87ec16c
O'Meara, N.
d3e58192-ac77-4497-a2d6-d3e7f2a1af89
Bleeck, S.
c888ccba-e64c-47bf-b8fa-a687e87ec16c

O'Meara, N. and Bleeck, S. (2013) Size discrimination of transient sounds: perception and modelling. Journal of Hearing Science, 3 (3), OA32-OA44.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Humans are able to get an impression of the size of an object by hearing it resonate. While this ability is well described for periodic speech sounds we investigate here the ability to discriminate the size of non-periodic transient impact sounds. Three experiments were performed on normal listeners (n=19) to investigate the importance of the spectral cue in different frequency regions. Recordings from pulse resonance sounds made by a metal ball hitting polystyrene spheres of 5 different sizes were used in the experiments. Recordings were manipulated in order to show that the same cues used in speaker size discrimination are used for transient signals. Results show that the most prominent resonances are the most important cue, but frequencies above 8 kHz also contribute. The results are explained by physiologically inspired model of size discrimination that is based on the Auditory Image Model, and its key part is the Mellin transform. The model can predict which of two objects is bigger. We conclude that similar cues that are used for speaker size discrimination are important for transient sounds

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Published date: 2013
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361272
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361272
ISSN: 2083-389x
PURE UUID: fbb7aebf-6506-4ae4-89d9-f124d39f3472
ORCID for S. Bleeck: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4378-3394

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Date deposited: 16 Jan 2014 13:44
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 04:08

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Contributors

Author: N. O'Meara
Author: S. Bleeck ORCID iD

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