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Motor overflow and children's tracking performance: is there a link?

Motor overflow and children's tracking performance: is there a link?
Motor overflow and children's tracking performance: is there a link?
The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of skill performance, motor overflow, and hand linkage in the form of mirror movements in a visual–manual tracking paradigm across practice trials. We hypothesized that both the amount of motor overflow and the degree of hand linkage would be linked in an inverse way to the quality of task performance. Furthermore, we expected a short-term decrease in both of these factors as children practiced and improved their task performance. Sixteen right-handed, 6-year-old children tracked a visual target with their right hand by pinching two parallel steel bars instrumented with strain gauges. The left hand was also positioned by similar instrumented steel bars to measure overflow/mirroring. At both the beginning and end of practice trials, a cluster analysis was used to determine relationships among performance, overflow, and hand linkage variables. In general, the results support the main hypothesis that the amount of motor overflow and the degree of hand linkage are linked to the quality of task performance, but the relationships between these variables across short-term learning are nonlinear
0012-1630
178-187
Lazarus, Jo-Anne C.
4c4e8dfb-d2a9-4b10-b4b9-1014181b8550
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Lazarus, Jo-Anne C.
4c4e8dfb-d2a9-4b10-b4b9-1014181b8550
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e

Lazarus, Jo-Anne C. and Whitall, Jill (1999) Motor overflow and children's tracking performance: is there a link? Developmental Psychobiology, 35 (3), 178-187. (doi:10.1002/(SICI)1098-2302(199911)35:3<178::AID-DEV2>3.0.CO;2-O). (PMID:10531530)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of skill performance, motor overflow, and hand linkage in the form of mirror movements in a visual–manual tracking paradigm across practice trials. We hypothesized that both the amount of motor overflow and the degree of hand linkage would be linked in an inverse way to the quality of task performance. Furthermore, we expected a short-term decrease in both of these factors as children practiced and improved their task performance. Sixteen right-handed, 6-year-old children tracked a visual target with their right hand by pinching two parallel steel bars instrumented with strain gauges. The left hand was also positioned by similar instrumented steel bars to measure overflow/mirroring. At both the beginning and end of practice trials, a cluster analysis was used to determine relationships among performance, overflow, and hand linkage variables. In general, the results support the main hypothesis that the amount of motor overflow and the degree of hand linkage are linked to the quality of task performance, but the relationships between these variables across short-term learning are nonlinear

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Published date: November 1999
Organisations: Faculty of Social, Human and Mathematical Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 361308
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361308
ISSN: 0012-1630
PURE UUID: 8a31df62-7c82-4f8f-a7cf-ab77fc884300

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Date deposited: 17 Jan 2014 09:49
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:14

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Contributors

Author: Jo-Anne C. Lazarus
Author: Jill Whitall

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