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Bimanual finger tapping: effects of frequency and auditory information on timing consistency and coordination

Bimanual finger tapping: effects of frequency and auditory information on timing consistency and coordination
Bimanual finger tapping: effects of frequency and auditory information on timing consistency and coordination
The authors' goal in this study was to probe the basis for an earlier, unexpected finding that preferred-frequency finger tapping tends to have higher frequencies and to be less stable for in-phase than for antiphase tasks. In follow-up experiments, 3 protocols were employed: a preferred-frequency replication in both coordination modes, a metronome-driven matching of the preferred frequencies to each of the coordination modes, and a frequency scaling of both modes. The original findings were affirmed for preferred frequency. Tapping to a metronome had a differential effect on in-phase and antiphase: A more stable coupling across frequencies was exhibited during in-phase. Under frequency scaling, the antiphase pattern decomposed at lower frequencies than did in-phase, but no phase transitions were observed. The loss of stable coordination in both modes was attended by sudden increases in frequency differences between fingers and by phase wandering. The emergence of those effects is discussed in light of asymmetric modifications to the Haken-Kelso-Bunz model (H. Haken, J. A. S. Kelso, & H. Bunz, 1985) and the task constraints of tapping
0022-2895
176-191
Forrester, Larry
f4cb091c-9475-40df-a515-0207765cecf9
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Forrester, Larry
f4cb091c-9475-40df-a515-0207765cecf9
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e

Forrester, Larry and Whitall, Jill (2000) Bimanual finger tapping: effects of frequency and auditory information on timing consistency and coordination. Journal of Motor Behavior, 32 (2), 176-191. (doi:10.1080/00222890009601369). (PMID:11005947)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The authors' goal in this study was to probe the basis for an earlier, unexpected finding that preferred-frequency finger tapping tends to have higher frequencies and to be less stable for in-phase than for antiphase tasks. In follow-up experiments, 3 protocols were employed: a preferred-frequency replication in both coordination modes, a metronome-driven matching of the preferred frequencies to each of the coordination modes, and a frequency scaling of both modes. The original findings were affirmed for preferred frequency. Tapping to a metronome had a differential effect on in-phase and antiphase: A more stable coupling across frequencies was exhibited during in-phase. Under frequency scaling, the antiphase pattern decomposed at lower frequencies than did in-phase, but no phase transitions were observed. The loss of stable coordination in both modes was attended by sudden increases in frequency differences between fingers and by phase wandering. The emergence of those effects is discussed in light of asymmetric modifications to the Haken-Kelso-Bunz model (H. Haken, J. A. S. Kelso, & H. Bunz, 1985) and the task constraints of tapping

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Published date: 2000
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361333
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361333
ISSN: 0022-2895
PURE UUID: 1f8c19de-5972-4062-add8-061e467d1308

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Date deposited: 17 Jan 2014 14:13
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:04

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