The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Transitions to and from asymmetrical gait patterns

Transitions to and from asymmetrical gait patterns
Transitions to and from asymmetrical gait patterns
Asymmetrical gait patterns such as the gallop provide insight into the complexity of human locomotion. The nature of spontaneous (e.g., walk-run), quasi-spontaneous (e.g., gallop-walk), and intentional (e.g., walk-gallop) transitions was analyzed in 2 ways in the present study. In Analysis 1, the authors used step-wise regression to associate 10 physical characteristics with gait transitions. Transition predictability was moderate; thigh length best predicted 3 of 6 transitions. In Analysis 2, the dynamic characteristics of transitions (order parameters, phase shifts, multistability, and critical fluctuations) were described; those characteristics existed for all transition types. The results of the analyses suggest that intentional transitions are less biomechanically predictable than are spontaneous transitions and that transitions between gait pairs (e.g., walk-gallop and gallop-walk), regardless of velocity direction, have more in common than do transitions requiring specific intention
0022-2895
13-27
Getchell, Nancy
ad8930a7-1a17-4c02-941a-cbe52984277f
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Getchell, Nancy
ad8930a7-1a17-4c02-941a-cbe52984277f
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e

Getchell, Nancy and Whitall, Jill (2004) Transitions to and from asymmetrical gait patterns. Journal of Motor Behavior, 36 (1), 13-27. (doi:10.3200/JMBR.36.1.13-27). (PMID:14766485)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Asymmetrical gait patterns such as the gallop provide insight into the complexity of human locomotion. The nature of spontaneous (e.g., walk-run), quasi-spontaneous (e.g., gallop-walk), and intentional (e.g., walk-gallop) transitions was analyzed in 2 ways in the present study. In Analysis 1, the authors used step-wise regression to associate 10 physical characteristics with gait transitions. Transition predictability was moderate; thigh length best predicted 3 of 6 transitions. In Analysis 2, the dynamic characteristics of transitions (order parameters, phase shifts, multistability, and critical fluctuations) were described; those characteristics existed for all transition types. The results of the analyses suggest that intentional transitions are less biomechanically predictable than are spontaneous transitions and that transitions between gait pairs (e.g., walk-gallop and gallop-walk), regardless of velocity direction, have more in common than do transitions requiring specific intention

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2004
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361335
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361335
ISSN: 0022-2895
PURE UUID: e9d42f0c-d5c9-4911-a45d-0ada312ca0bd

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jan 2014 14:29
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:14

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Nancy Getchell
Author: Jill Whitall

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×