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Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for quiet standing

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for quiet standing
Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for quiet standing
In two experiments, the ability to use multisensory information (haptic information, provided by lightly touching a stationary surface, and vision) for quiet standing was examined in typically developing (TD) children, adults, and in seven-year-old children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Four sensory conditions (no touch/no vision, with touch/no vision, no touch/with vision, and with touch/with vision) were employed. In experiment 1, we tested four-, six- and eight-year-old TD children and adults to provide a developmental landscape for performance on this task. In experiment 2, we tested a group of seven-year-old children with DCD and their age-matched TD peers. For all groups, touch robustly attenuated standing sway suggesting that children as young as four years old use touch information similarly to adults. Touch was less effective in children with DCD compared to their TD peers, especially in attenuating their sway velocity. Children with DCD, unlike their TD peers, also benefited from using vision to reduce sway. The present results suggest that children with DCD benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for standing control possibly due to their less well developed internal models of body orientation and self-motion. Internal model deficits, combined with other known deficits such as postural muscles activation timing deficits, may exacerbate the balance impairment in children with DCD
0966-6362
183-190
Bair, Woei-Nan
8196d429-86ff-4bc2-b94a-88219b51379a
Barela, José A.
cc7227e7-6a48-4ee0-8d50-60dfb5fb0d24
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Jeka, John J.
5642945f-1f9a-45c6-b6f6-1da1ef08a44b
Clark, Jane E.
d5c0297c-431e-4880-b61c-b87d7611f3cb
Bair, Woei-Nan
8196d429-86ff-4bc2-b94a-88219b51379a
Barela, José A.
cc7227e7-6a48-4ee0-8d50-60dfb5fb0d24
Whitall, Jill
9761aefb-be80-4270-bc1f-0e726399376e
Jeka, John J.
5642945f-1f9a-45c6-b6f6-1da1ef08a44b
Clark, Jane E.
d5c0297c-431e-4880-b61c-b87d7611f3cb

Bair, Woei-Nan, Barela, José A., Whitall, Jill, Jeka, John J. and Clark, Jane E. (2011) Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for quiet standing. Gait & Posture, 34 (2), 183-190. (PMID:21571533)

Record type: Article

Abstract

In two experiments, the ability to use multisensory information (haptic information, provided by lightly touching a stationary surface, and vision) for quiet standing was examined in typically developing (TD) children, adults, and in seven-year-old children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Four sensory conditions (no touch/no vision, with touch/no vision, no touch/with vision, and with touch/with vision) were employed. In experiment 1, we tested four-, six- and eight-year-old TD children and adults to provide a developmental landscape for performance on this task. In experiment 2, we tested a group of seven-year-old children with DCD and their age-matched TD peers. For all groups, touch robustly attenuated standing sway suggesting that children as young as four years old use touch information similarly to adults. Touch was less effective in children with DCD compared to their TD peers, especially in attenuating their sway velocity. Children with DCD, unlike their TD peers, also benefited from using vision to reduce sway. The present results suggest that children with DCD benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for standing control possibly due to their less well developed internal models of body orientation and self-motion. Internal model deficits, combined with other known deficits such as postural muscles activation timing deficits, may exacerbate the balance impairment in children with DCD

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More information

Published date: June 2011
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361404
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361404
ISSN: 0966-6362
PURE UUID: 89baf856-f126-428d-ac3e-8e39cc5188f2

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2014 11:09
Last modified: 01 Oct 2017 00:19

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Contributors

Author: Woei-Nan Bair
Author: José A. Barela
Author: Jill Whitall
Author: John J. Jeka
Author: Jane E. Clark

University divisions

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