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Bituplaning a low dry friction phenomenon of new bituminous road surfaces

Bituplaning a low dry friction phenomenon of new bituminous road surfaces
Bituplaning a low dry friction phenomenon of new bituminous road surfaces
The potential for binder rich bituminous road surfaces to deliver low levels of dry friction was first noted in 1944. Using established test methods exploiting basic principles of physics first tested in criminal court in the 1940s (and still in use today) it has been possible to show statistically that modern negative textured road surfaces (NTS) deliver levels of dry friction significantly below those considered typical by collision investigators for the more traditional positive textured surfaces (PTS). NTS surfaces are shown to perform relatively worse in the absence of ABS (Anti-Blockier System, Anti-lock braking) than PTS equivalents such as Hot Rolled Asphalt (HRA). Skid tests undertaken on DRY NTS surfaces with ABS braking have been shown to manifest momentary low levels of deceleration similar to those experienced during NOABS tests on the same surfaces and to generate dash like skid marks atypical of ABS tests on DRY PTS surfaces. The ratio of peak to sliding friction also appears lower for dry NTS surfaces than for Dry PTS surfaces documented in the literature.

Using high-speed video and false colour infrared imaging it has been possible to see the low friction phenomenon termed “bituplaning”. Vehicles equipped with ABS have also been shown to suffer momentary “bituplanes” resulting in less than optimum performance. Tyre deformation during dry skidding on NTS appears reduced in relation to a PTS equivalent.

Bullas, John Charles
c92df58f-05b6-49ab-a452-c7eb607cfbaf
Bullas, John Charles
c92df58f-05b6-49ab-a452-c7eb607cfbaf
Hounsell, Nicholas
54781702-9b09-4fb7-8d9e-f0b7833731e5

(2007) Bituplaning a low dry friction phenomenon of new bituminous road surfaces. University of Southampton, Civil Engineering and the Environment, Doctoral Thesis, 362pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The potential for binder rich bituminous road surfaces to deliver low levels of dry friction was first noted in 1944. Using established test methods exploiting basic principles of physics first tested in criminal court in the 1940s (and still in use today) it has been possible to show statistically that modern negative textured road surfaces (NTS) deliver levels of dry friction significantly below those considered typical by collision investigators for the more traditional positive textured surfaces (PTS). NTS surfaces are shown to perform relatively worse in the absence of ABS (Anti-Blockier System, Anti-lock braking) than PTS equivalents such as Hot Rolled Asphalt (HRA). Skid tests undertaken on DRY NTS surfaces with ABS braking have been shown to manifest momentary low levels of deceleration similar to those experienced during NOABS tests on the same surfaces and to generate dash like skid marks atypical of ABS tests on DRY PTS surfaces. The ratio of peak to sliding friction also appears lower for dry NTS surfaces than for Dry PTS surfaces documented in the literature.

Using high-speed video and false colour infrared imaging it has been possible to see the low friction phenomenon termed “bituplaning”. Vehicles equipped with ABS have also been shown to suffer momentary “bituplanes” resulting in less than optimum performance. Tyre deformation during dry skidding on NTS appears reduced in relation to a PTS equivalent.

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More information

Published date: May 2007
Organisations: University of Southampton, Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361460
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361460
PURE UUID: 15b08461-84dc-41a7-b354-5b41954fa15f

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Date deposited: 21 Jan 2014 14:52
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:02

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Contributors

Author: John Charles Bullas
Thesis advisor: Nicholas Hounsell

University divisions

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