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Doorstep interactions and interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal

Doorstep interactions and interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal
Doorstep interactions and interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal
This article presents an analysis of interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal in face-to-face surveys. The focus is on the interaction between the householder and the interviewer on the doorstep, including initial reactions from the householder, and interviewer characteristics, behaviors, and skills. In contrast to most previous research on interviewer effects, which analyzed final response behavior, the focus here is on the analysis of the process that leads to cooperation or refusal. Multilevel multinomial discrete-time event history modeling is used to examine jointly the different outcomes at each call, taking account of the influence of interviewer characteristics, call histories, and sample member characteristics. The study benefits from a rich data set comprising call record data (paradata) from several face-to-face surveys linked to interviewer observations, detailed interviewer information, and census records. The models have implications for survey practice and may be used in responsive survey designs to inform effective interviewer calling strategies.
tailoring, interviewer effects, multilevel modeling, call record data, paradata
0049-1241
1-29
Durrant, Gabriele B.
14fcc787-2666-46f2-a097-e4b98a210610
D'Arrigo, Julia
07400226-3e74-4795-bd5d-f1071270b1b6
Durrant, Gabriele B.
14fcc787-2666-46f2-a097-e4b98a210610
D'Arrigo, Julia
07400226-3e74-4795-bd5d-f1071270b1b6

Durrant, Gabriele B. and D'Arrigo, Julia (2014) Doorstep interactions and interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal. Sociological Methods and Research, 1-29. (doi:10.1177/0049124114521148).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article presents an analysis of interviewer effects on the process leading to cooperation or refusal in face-to-face surveys. The focus is on the interaction between the householder and the interviewer on the doorstep, including initial reactions from the householder, and interviewer characteristics, behaviors, and skills. In contrast to most previous research on interviewer effects, which analyzed final response behavior, the focus here is on the analysis of the process that leads to cooperation or refusal. Multilevel multinomial discrete-time event history modeling is used to examine jointly the different outcomes at each call, taking account of the influence of interviewer characteristics, call histories, and sample member characteristics. The study benefits from a rich data set comprising call record data (paradata) from several face-to-face surveys linked to interviewer observations, detailed interviewer information, and census records. The models have implications for survey practice and may be used in responsive survey designs to inform effective interviewer calling strategies.

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Durrant DArrigo_SMR_interv effects_2014.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 25 March 2014
Keywords: tailoring, interviewer effects, multilevel modeling, call record data, paradata
Organisations: Statistical Sciences Research Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361566
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361566
ISSN: 0049-1241
PURE UUID: cc3bdb3c-ddc1-4ed5-9b44-784bb6c6c3c1

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Date deposited: 28 Jan 2014 14:08
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:19

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Contributors

Author: Julia D'Arrigo

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