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Isotopic characteristics of subduction fluids in an intra-oceanic setting, Izu–Bonin Arc, Japan

Isotopic characteristics of subduction fluids in an intra-oceanic setting, Izu–Bonin Arc, Japan
Isotopic characteristics of subduction fluids in an intra-oceanic setting, Izu–Bonin Arc, Japan
New radiogenic isotope and trace element data are presented for the volcanic sequences along 600 km of the active Izu–Bonin arc, the Oligocene Izu arc, and their associated rift basins. As with many intra-oceanic island arcs, the Pliocene–Recent Izu–Bonin frontal-arc lavas are highly depleted in Zr, Nb and the rare-earth elements relative to typical mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), indicating that the mantle wedge source has undergone a previous episode of melting. Ratios between these elements (such as Nb/Zr and La/Sm), as well as 143Nd/144Nd, do not vary significantly along the length of the frontal-arc. These parameters suggest that each of the arc volcanoes is derived from similar melt fractions of the mantle wedge. However, Ba/Zr, Ba/Rb and 87Sr/86Sr increase along the frontal-arc to the north. This leads us to propose that a variable enrichment in Ba and radiogenic Sr is superimposed on the mantle wedge. Sr–Nd and Pb–Nd isotope variation indicate that both Sr and Pb become more radiogenic after fluid addition. However, Pb isotope ratios do not correlate with increases in Pb concentration or ratios such as Ba/Zr and Nb/Pb. In other words, the Pb isotopic composition of the arc lavas appears to be independent of the amount of Pb introduced by subduction fluids into the mantle source. This buffering of Pb isotopes along the frontal-arc means that the isotopic composition of the lavas is indistinguishable from that of the fluid. Isotopic mixing models presented for the arc are only illustrative of the many plausible combinations of components and quantities. Despite this, we are able to determine that the mantle wedge has isotopic characteristics similar to Indian Ocean MORB, and that the subduction-fluid solute is primarily derived from subducted oceanic basalt with a <2% contribution from subducted sediment. Lavas in the Oligocene Izu arc and fore-arc basin were derived from a mantle wedge of similar composition to the active arc. Despite levels of Pb enrichment comparable to those of the modern arc, the Pb isotopes of the Oligocene volcanics indicate a lower sediment input into the melting region.
island arcs, isotopes, subduction, Izu–Bonin Arc
0012-821X
79-98
Taylor, Rex N.
094be7fd-ef61-4acd-a795-7daba2bc6183
Nesbitt, Robert W.
6a124ad1-4e6d-4407-b92f-592f7fd682e4
Taylor, Rex N.
094be7fd-ef61-4acd-a795-7daba2bc6183
Nesbitt, Robert W.
6a124ad1-4e6d-4407-b92f-592f7fd682e4

Taylor, Rex N. and Nesbitt, Robert W. (1998) Isotopic characteristics of subduction fluids in an intra-oceanic setting, Izu–Bonin Arc, Japan. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 164 (1-2), 79-98. (doi:10.1016/S0012-821X(98)00182-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

New radiogenic isotope and trace element data are presented for the volcanic sequences along 600 km of the active Izu–Bonin arc, the Oligocene Izu arc, and their associated rift basins. As with many intra-oceanic island arcs, the Pliocene–Recent Izu–Bonin frontal-arc lavas are highly depleted in Zr, Nb and the rare-earth elements relative to typical mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), indicating that the mantle wedge source has undergone a previous episode of melting. Ratios between these elements (such as Nb/Zr and La/Sm), as well as 143Nd/144Nd, do not vary significantly along the length of the frontal-arc. These parameters suggest that each of the arc volcanoes is derived from similar melt fractions of the mantle wedge. However, Ba/Zr, Ba/Rb and 87Sr/86Sr increase along the frontal-arc to the north. This leads us to propose that a variable enrichment in Ba and radiogenic Sr is superimposed on the mantle wedge. Sr–Nd and Pb–Nd isotope variation indicate that both Sr and Pb become more radiogenic after fluid addition. However, Pb isotope ratios do not correlate with increases in Pb concentration or ratios such as Ba/Zr and Nb/Pb. In other words, the Pb isotopic composition of the arc lavas appears to be independent of the amount of Pb introduced by subduction fluids into the mantle source. This buffering of Pb isotopes along the frontal-arc means that the isotopic composition of the lavas is indistinguishable from that of the fluid. Isotopic mixing models presented for the arc are only illustrative of the many plausible combinations of components and quantities. Despite this, we are able to determine that the mantle wedge has isotopic characteristics similar to Indian Ocean MORB, and that the subduction-fluid solute is primarily derived from subducted oceanic basalt with a <2% contribution from subducted sediment. Lavas in the Oligocene Izu arc and fore-arc basin were derived from a mantle wedge of similar composition to the active arc. Despite levels of Pb enrichment comparable to those of the modern arc, the Pb isotopes of the Oligocene volcanics indicate a lower sediment input into the melting region.

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More information

Published date: 15 December 1998
Keywords: island arcs, isotopes, subduction, Izu–Bonin Arc
Organisations: Geochemistry

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Local EPrints ID: 361630
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361630
ISSN: 0012-821X
PURE UUID: 8e3298c0-3b02-4b2f-937e-c0e5efde9ef5

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Date deposited: 28 Jan 2014 11:56
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:13

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