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Mortality at older ages and moves in residential and sheltered housing: evidence from the UK

Mortality at older ages and moves in residential and sheltered housing: evidence from the UK
Mortality at older ages and moves in residential and sheltered housing: evidence from the UK
Background: The study examines the relationship between transitions to residential and sheltered housing and mortality. Past research has focused on housing moves over extended time periods and subsequent mortality. In this paper, annual housing transitions allow the identification of the patterning of housing moves, the duration of stay in each sector and the assessment of the relationship of preceding moves to a heightened risk of dying.

Methods: The study uses longitudinal data constructed from pooled observations from the British Household Panel Survey (waves 1993–2008). Records were pooled for all cases where the survey member is 65?years or over and living in private housing at baseline and observed at three consecutive time points, including baseline (N=23?727). Binary logistic regression (death as outcome three waves after baseline) explored the relative strength of different housing transitions, controlling for sociodemographic predictors.

Results: (1) Transition to residential housing within the previous 12?months was associated with the highest mortality risk. (2) Results support existing findings showing an interaction between marital status and mortality, whereby unmarried persons were more likely to die. (3) Higher male mortality was observed across all housing transitions.

Conclusions: An older person's move to residential housing is associated with a higher risk of mortality within 12?months of the move. Survivors living in residential housing for more than a year, show a similar probability of dying to those living in sheltered housing. Results highlight that it is the type of accommodation that affects an older person's mortality risk, and the length of time they spend there.
0143-005X
524-529
Robards, James
4c79fa72-e722-4a2a-a289-1d2bad2c2343
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Robards, James
4c79fa72-e722-4a2a-a289-1d2bad2c2343
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb

Robards, James, Evandrou, Maria, Falkingham, Jane and Vlachantoni, Athina (2014) Mortality at older ages and moves in residential and sheltered housing: evidence from the UK. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 68 (6), 524-529. (doi:10.1136/jech-2013-203097).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The study examines the relationship between transitions to residential and sheltered housing and mortality. Past research has focused on housing moves over extended time periods and subsequent mortality. In this paper, annual housing transitions allow the identification of the patterning of housing moves, the duration of stay in each sector and the assessment of the relationship of preceding moves to a heightened risk of dying.

Methods: The study uses longitudinal data constructed from pooled observations from the British Household Panel Survey (waves 1993–2008). Records were pooled for all cases where the survey member is 65?years or over and living in private housing at baseline and observed at three consecutive time points, including baseline (N=23?727). Binary logistic regression (death as outcome three waves after baseline) explored the relative strength of different housing transitions, controlling for sociodemographic predictors.

Results: (1) Transition to residential housing within the previous 12?months was associated with the highest mortality risk. (2) Results support existing findings showing an interaction between marital status and mortality, whereby unmarried persons were more likely to die. (3) Higher male mortality was observed across all housing transitions.

Conclusions: An older person's move to residential housing is associated with a higher risk of mortality within 12?months of the move. Survivors living in residential housing for more than a year, show a similar probability of dying to those living in sheltered housing. Results highlight that it is the type of accommodation that affects an older person's mortality risk, and the length of time they spend there.

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More information

Submitted date: 11 July 2013
Accepted/In Press date: 4 February 2014
Published date: 17 March 2014
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361839
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361839
ISSN: 0143-005X
PURE UUID: 53809c4a-ee0f-4c38-8a4d-aeff8f0d6bee
ORCID for James Robards: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4784-5679
ORCID for Maria Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for Athina Vlachantoni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1539-3057

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2014 15:15
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 03:00

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Contributors

Author: James Robards ORCID iD
Author: Maria Evandrou ORCID iD
Author: Jane Falkingham ORCID iD

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