The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

X-ray mass absorption applied to mineral and rock analysis

X-ray mass absorption applied to mineral and rock analysis
X-ray mass absorption applied to mineral and rock analysis
A method of determining mineral compositions by measurement of the X-ray mass absorption coefficient has been investigated. Absorption measurements have been made on several simple two and three component systems.

For a two component system, the total mass absorption coefficient is linearly related to the composition, and rapid calibration may be achieved on the basis of data for the two pure components. The method may be extended in particular circumstances to allow determination of three component systems. Several examples are presented, and the applicability of the technique is discussed.

Previous calculations have indicated that the absorption of a rock relative to some standard is almost constant over a large range in wavelength. Direct measurements suggest that this relationship holds only if the relative absorption has a value close to 1.0. The relationship has considerable potential for use in rapid matrix corrections in X-ray fluorescence spectrography, since a single measurement at a convenient wavelength gives a relative matrix correction which is applicable over a large wavelength range.
0812-0099
217-224
Mastins, H.
a2ba080c-dee8-4b4b-9b63-46f35fa21256
Jones, J.B.
d4925d89-b86f-47e8-8ed3-c94a09b9dc2b
Nesbitt, R.W.
6a124ad1-4e6d-4407-b92f-592f7fd682e4
Mastins, H.
a2ba080c-dee8-4b4b-9b63-46f35fa21256
Jones, J.B.
d4925d89-b86f-47e8-8ed3-c94a09b9dc2b
Nesbitt, R.W.
6a124ad1-4e6d-4407-b92f-592f7fd682e4

Mastins, H., Jones, J.B. and Nesbitt, R.W. (1972) X-ray mass absorption applied to mineral and rock analysis. Journal of the Geological Society of Australia, 19 (2), 217-224. (doi:10.1080/14400957208527883).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A method of determining mineral compositions by measurement of the X-ray mass absorption coefficient has been investigated. Absorption measurements have been made on several simple two and three component systems.

For a two component system, the total mass absorption coefficient is linearly related to the composition, and rapid calibration may be achieved on the basis of data for the two pure components. The method may be extended in particular circumstances to allow determination of three component systems. Several examples are presented, and the applicability of the technique is discussed.

Previous calculations have indicated that the absorption of a rock relative to some standard is almost constant over a large range in wavelength. Direct measurements suggest that this relationship holds only if the relative absorption has a value close to 1.0. The relationship has considerable potential for use in rapid matrix corrections in X-ray fluorescence spectrography, since a single measurement at a convenient wavelength gives a relative matrix correction which is applicable over a large wavelength range.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 1972
Organisations: Geochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361866
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361866
ISSN: 0812-0099
PURE UUID: c08c877a-7316-49f6-b6e6-1c00590bfa6c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Feb 2014 16:43
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:57

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×