The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Aquatic leisure satisfaction and engagement in neuropalliative disability management

Aquatic leisure satisfaction and engagement in neuropalliative disability management
Aquatic leisure satisfaction and engagement in neuropalliative disability management
This article describes a single-case design study and uses an occupational science focus to explore the effects of ‘Aquability’ as perceived by participants with neuropalliative conditions. Data collection tools include the Individual Child Engagement Record and the adapted Leisure Satisfaction Scale – short form by 14 participants (who had Barthel scores averaging 7/100). The time-sampled observations of engagement showed a significant difference between the scores for the control condition and the ‘Aquability’ sessions. The participants reported being in control, learning about themselves or others and feeling healthier after a session. They reported experiencing a sense of achievement and novelty, which was interesting and enjoyable. ‘Aquability’ appears to be a satisfying use of free time for participants with neuropalliative conditions.
0283-9318
519-527
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652

Fenech, Anne (2012) Aquatic leisure satisfaction and engagement in neuropalliative disability management. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 26 (3), 519-527. (doi:10.1111/j.1471-6712.2011.00958.x). (PMID:22150767)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article describes a single-case design study and uses an occupational science focus to explore the effects of ‘Aquability’ as perceived by participants with neuropalliative conditions. Data collection tools include the Individual Child Engagement Record and the adapted Leisure Satisfaction Scale – short form by 14 participants (who had Barthel scores averaging 7/100). The time-sampled observations of engagement showed a significant difference between the scores for the control condition and the ‘Aquability’ sessions. The participants reported being in control, learning about themselves or others and feeling healthier after a session. They reported experiencing a sense of achievement and novelty, which was interesting and enjoyable. ‘Aquability’ appears to be a satisfying use of free time for participants with neuropalliative conditions.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 December 2011
Published date: September 2012
Organisations: Physical & Rehabilitation Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361884
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361884
ISSN: 0283-9318
PURE UUID: 3877a2ae-f8e8-4f88-bd79-a0f8d904e269
ORCID for Anne Fenech: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5187-2912

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Feb 2014 14:46
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×