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Association between maternal folate concentrations during pregnancy and insulin resistance in Indian children

Association between maternal folate concentrations during pregnancy and insulin resistance in Indian children
Association between maternal folate concentrations during pregnancy and insulin resistance in Indian children
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In an Indian birth cohort, higher maternal homocysteine concentration in pregnancy was associated with lower birthweight of the offspring. Lower maternal vitamin B12 and higher folate concentrations were associated with higher offspring insulin resistance. Disordered one-carbon metabolism during early development may increase later metabolic risk. We explored these associations in another birth cohort in India at three age points.

METHODS: We measured plasma vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations at 30 ± 2 weeks' gestation in 654 women who delivered at one hospital. Neonatal anthropometry was recorded, and the children's glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at 5, 9.5 and 13.5 years of age. Insulin resistance was estimated using HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

RESULTS: Maternal homocysteine concentrations were inversely associated with all neonatal anthropometric measurements (p < 0.05), and positively associated with glucose concentrations in the children at 5 (30 min; p = 0.007) and 9.5 years of age (120 min; p = 0.02). Higher maternal folate concentrations were associated with higher HOMA-IR in the children at 9.5 (p = 0.03) and 13.5 years of age (p = 0.03). Maternal vitamin B12 concentrations were unrelated to offspring outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Maternal vitamin B12 status did not predict insulin resistance in our cohort. However, associations of maternal homocysteine and folate concentrations with birth size, and with childhood insulin resistance and glycaemia in the offspring, suggest a role for nutritionally driven disturbances in one-carbon metabolism in fetal programming of diabetes.
child, folate, homocysteine, insulin resistance, pregnancy, programming, vitamin B12
0012-186X
110-121
Krishnaveni, Ghattu v.
cd20fca7-d151-43b7-a7b4-d6051d6dd922
Veena, Sargoor R.
549cbba2-5ac1-4088-be37-4c1e656bddea
Karat, Samuel C.
69af17ad-2c2a-464d-bb13-df1c40f51fc8
Yajnik, Chittaranjan
f5962976-1322-4c7e-860e-455a29396b4e
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Krishnaveni, Ghattu v.
cd20fca7-d151-43b7-a7b4-d6051d6dd922
Veena, Sargoor R.
549cbba2-5ac1-4088-be37-4c1e656bddea
Karat, Samuel C.
69af17ad-2c2a-464d-bb13-df1c40f51fc8
Yajnik, Chittaranjan
f5962976-1322-4c7e-860e-455a29396b4e
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18

Krishnaveni, Ghattu v., Veena, Sargoor R., Karat, Samuel C., Yajnik, Chittaranjan and Fall, Caroline H.D. (2014) Association between maternal folate concentrations during pregnancy and insulin resistance in Indian children. Diabetologia, 57 (1), 110-121. (doi:10.1007/s00125-013-3086-7). (PMID:24162586)

Record type: Article

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In an Indian birth cohort, higher maternal homocysteine concentration in pregnancy was associated with lower birthweight of the offspring. Lower maternal vitamin B12 and higher folate concentrations were associated with higher offspring insulin resistance. Disordered one-carbon metabolism during early development may increase later metabolic risk. We explored these associations in another birth cohort in India at three age points.

METHODS: We measured plasma vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations at 30 ± 2 weeks' gestation in 654 women who delivered at one hospital. Neonatal anthropometry was recorded, and the children's glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at 5, 9.5 and 13.5 years of age. Insulin resistance was estimated using HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

RESULTS: Maternal homocysteine concentrations were inversely associated with all neonatal anthropometric measurements (p < 0.05), and positively associated with glucose concentrations in the children at 5 (30 min; p = 0.007) and 9.5 years of age (120 min; p = 0.02). Higher maternal folate concentrations were associated with higher HOMA-IR in the children at 9.5 (p = 0.03) and 13.5 years of age (p = 0.03). Maternal vitamin B12 concentrations were unrelated to offspring outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Maternal vitamin B12 status did not predict insulin resistance in our cohort. However, associations of maternal homocysteine and folate concentrations with birth size, and with childhood insulin resistance and glycaemia in the offspring, suggest a role for nutritionally driven disturbances in one-carbon metabolism in fetal programming of diabetes.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 26 October 2013
Published date: January 2014
Keywords: child, folate, homocysteine, insulin resistance, pregnancy, programming, vitamin B12
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361929
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361929
ISSN: 0012-186X
PURE UUID: c9a04750-70ef-4d65-a742-1d494de410b7
ORCID for Caroline H.D. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

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Date deposited: 07 Feb 2014 14:15
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:37

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Contributors

Author: Ghattu v. Krishnaveni
Author: Sargoor R. Veena
Author: Samuel C. Karat
Author: Chittaranjan Yajnik

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