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Growth from birth to adulthood and bone phenotype in early old age: a British birth cohort study

Growth from birth to adulthood and bone phenotype in early old age: a British birth cohort study
Growth from birth to adulthood and bone phenotype in early old age: a British birth cohort study
There is growing evidence that early growth influences bone mass in later life but most studies are limited to birth weight and/or early infant growth and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements. In a British birth cohort study with prospective measures of lifetime height and weight, we investigated the growth trajectory in relation to bone in males (M) and females (F) at 60 to 64 years old. Outcomes were DXA measures of hip and spine areal bone density (aBMD) (n = 1658) and pQCT measures of distal and diaphyseal radius cross-sectional area (CSA), strength, and volumetric bone density (vBMD) (n = 1350 of the 1658). Regression models examined percentage change in bone parameters with standardized measures of birth weight, height, and weight. A series of conditional growth models were fitted for height and weight gain (using intervals: birth-2, 2-4, 4-7, 7-15, 15-20, 20-36, and 36-64 years) and height gain (using intervals: 2-4, 4-7, 7-15, and 15-36 years). Birth weight was positively related to bone CSA (M: 1.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3%-2.5%; F: 1.3%; 95% CI, 0.3%-2.4% per 1 SD increase in birth weight for diaphyseal CSA) and strength (M: 1.8%; 95% CI, 0.3-3.4; F: 2.0%; 95% CI, 0.5-3.5). No positive associations were found with trabecular, total, or cortical vBMD. One SD change in prepubertal and postpubertal height and weight velocities were associated with between 2% and 5% greater bone CSA and strength. Height gain in later years was negatively associated with trabecular vBMD. Weight gain velocity during the adult years was positively associated with up to 4% greater trabecular and total BMD, and 4% greater aBMD at hip and spine. In a cohort born in the early post-war period, higher birth weight, gaining weight and height faster than others, particularly through the prepubertal and postpubertal periods, was positively related to bone strength, mostly through greater bone CSA, at 60 to 64 years.
cohort, growth trajectory, bone strength, bone area, BMD
0884-0431
123-133
Kuh, Diana
4f3b51aa-21a0-4d68-be14-e1ed75448aaf
Wills, Andrew K.
46f423e1-510f-49e2-9a26-5e846d84f3fd
Shah, Imran
e1101067-3c0e-4b20-b50f-dd9e9fd2cb78
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Hardy, Rebecca
99fecbaf-fc92-4354-aa02-cb904dd2bd32
Adams, Judith E.
2a5cb6a4-b282-416f-aabd-553121947e72
Ward, Kate
2155853e-6789-49ac-bb89-bf5af6289550
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
National Survey for Health and Development (NSHD) Scientific and Data Collection Team
Kuh, Diana
4f3b51aa-21a0-4d68-be14-e1ed75448aaf
Wills, Andrew K.
46f423e1-510f-49e2-9a26-5e846d84f3fd
Shah, Imran
e1101067-3c0e-4b20-b50f-dd9e9fd2cb78
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Hardy, Rebecca
99fecbaf-fc92-4354-aa02-cb904dd2bd32
Adams, Judith E.
2a5cb6a4-b282-416f-aabd-553121947e72
Ward, Kate
2155853e-6789-49ac-bb89-bf5af6289550
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Kuh, Diana, Wills, Andrew K., Shah, Imran, Prentice, Ann, Hardy, Rebecca, Adams, Judith E., Ward, Kate and Cooper, Cyrus , National Survey for Health and Development (NSHD) Scientific and Data Collection Team (2014) Growth from birth to adulthood and bone phenotype in early old age: a British birth cohort study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 29 (1), 123-133. (doi:10.1002/jbmr.2008). (PMID:23761289)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is growing evidence that early growth influences bone mass in later life but most studies are limited to birth weight and/or early infant growth and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements. In a British birth cohort study with prospective measures of lifetime height and weight, we investigated the growth trajectory in relation to bone in males (M) and females (F) at 60 to 64 years old. Outcomes were DXA measures of hip and spine areal bone density (aBMD) (n = 1658) and pQCT measures of distal and diaphyseal radius cross-sectional area (CSA), strength, and volumetric bone density (vBMD) (n = 1350 of the 1658). Regression models examined percentage change in bone parameters with standardized measures of birth weight, height, and weight. A series of conditional growth models were fitted for height and weight gain (using intervals: birth-2, 2-4, 4-7, 7-15, 15-20, 20-36, and 36-64 years) and height gain (using intervals: 2-4, 4-7, 7-15, and 15-36 years). Birth weight was positively related to bone CSA (M: 1.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3%-2.5%; F: 1.3%; 95% CI, 0.3%-2.4% per 1 SD increase in birth weight for diaphyseal CSA) and strength (M: 1.8%; 95% CI, 0.3-3.4; F: 2.0%; 95% CI, 0.5-3.5). No positive associations were found with trabecular, total, or cortical vBMD. One SD change in prepubertal and postpubertal height and weight velocities were associated with between 2% and 5% greater bone CSA and strength. Height gain in later years was negatively associated with trabecular vBMD. Weight gain velocity during the adult years was positively associated with up to 4% greater trabecular and total BMD, and 4% greater aBMD at hip and spine. In a cohort born in the early post-war period, higher birth weight, gaining weight and height faster than others, particularly through the prepubertal and postpubertal periods, was positively related to bone strength, mostly through greater bone CSA, at 60 to 64 years.

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More information

Published date: January 2014
Additional Information: © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: cohort, growth trajectory, bone strength, bone area, BMD
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361930
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361930
ISSN: 0884-0431
PURE UUID: a2b3607c-1c7b-4bdc-8f87-98792d25b664
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 07 Feb 2014 14:37
Last modified: 18 Dec 2019 01:38

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Contributors

Author: Diana Kuh
Author: Andrew K. Wills
Author: Imran Shah
Author: Ann Prentice
Author: Rebecca Hardy
Author: Judith E. Adams
Author: Kate Ward
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Corporate Author: National Survey for Health and Development (NSHD) Scientific and Data Collection Team

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