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Perception-action coupling in children with and without DCD: frequency locking between task-relevant auditory signals and motor responses in a dual-motor task

Perception-action coupling in children with and without DCD: frequency locking between task-relevant auditory signals and motor responses in a dual-motor task
Perception-action coupling in children with and without DCD: frequency locking between task-relevant auditory signals and motor responses in a dual-motor task
Background: the current research examines the relationship between perceptual and motor processes, known as perception–action or sensorimotor coupling, and the potential differences in perception–action coupling among children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and adults in a gross-motor co-ordination task (clapping while marching) when a task-relevant driving sensory signal is present.

Methods: ten children with DCD (7.32 + 0.23 years), eight typically developing (TD) children who were age-, gender- and racially/ethnically matched (6.91 + 0.24 years) and 10 college-aged adults were participants in this study. Participants clapped and marched to an auditory beat at four different frequencies: 0.8, 1.2,1.6 and 2.0 Hz. The relative timing measures of mean relative phase (MRP) and variability of relative phase (VRP) were calculated and compared using 3 (group) x 4 (frequency) x 2 (limb) anovas. Qualitatively, participants were assessed for the presence of absolute coupling (100% + 15% MRP).

Results: statistically significant differences in MRP occurred for coupling, frequency and group, and post hoc analysis indicated that the adult group differed from both the DCD and TD groups, who did not differ from each other. In VRP, there were significant main effects for coupling and group, and a significant interaction between group and frequency, with post hoc analysis indicating the DCD group to be different from the TD and adult groups. Qualitatively, both the adult and TD groups increased in the number of participants who adopt absolute coupling as frequency increases. In contrast, the DCD participants adopt this absolute coupling far less frequently overall; in fact, the number of participants adopting this pattern decreases as frequency increases.

Conclusions: these results indicate that children with DCD have difficulties with both the co-ordination and the control of their perception–action coupling for this particular task
0305-1862
679-692
Whitall, J.
9ad11814-bec4-4eab-a31f-e5f499403164
Getchell, N.
0eb1e9a7-8270-405b-bfaa-3b797eef6fc8
McMenamin, S.
a1195e7e-aece-4c3f-8ba3-84f05d822541
Horn, C.
63b631ad-e894-4371-ad90-aee616b880e0
Wilms-Floet, A.
243f8101-22a1-4ae1-b4a7-16fa4cc42b38
Clark, J.E.
42c368c8-0251-437b-96cf-de5835a1f032
Whitall, J.
9ad11814-bec4-4eab-a31f-e5f499403164
Getchell, N.
0eb1e9a7-8270-405b-bfaa-3b797eef6fc8
McMenamin, S.
a1195e7e-aece-4c3f-8ba3-84f05d822541
Horn, C.
63b631ad-e894-4371-ad90-aee616b880e0
Wilms-Floet, A.
243f8101-22a1-4ae1-b4a7-16fa4cc42b38
Clark, J.E.
42c368c8-0251-437b-96cf-de5835a1f032

Whitall, J., Getchell, N., McMenamin, S., Horn, C., Wilms-Floet, A. and Clark, J.E. (2006) Perception-action coupling in children with and without DCD: frequency locking between task-relevant auditory signals and motor responses in a dual-motor task. Child: Care, Health and Development, 32 (6), 679-692. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2214.2006.00676.x). (PMID:17018043)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: the current research examines the relationship between perceptual and motor processes, known as perception–action or sensorimotor coupling, and the potential differences in perception–action coupling among children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and adults in a gross-motor co-ordination task (clapping while marching) when a task-relevant driving sensory signal is present.

Methods: ten children with DCD (7.32 + 0.23 years), eight typically developing (TD) children who were age-, gender- and racially/ethnically matched (6.91 + 0.24 years) and 10 college-aged adults were participants in this study. Participants clapped and marched to an auditory beat at four different frequencies: 0.8, 1.2,1.6 and 2.0 Hz. The relative timing measures of mean relative phase (MRP) and variability of relative phase (VRP) were calculated and compared using 3 (group) x 4 (frequency) x 2 (limb) anovas. Qualitatively, participants were assessed for the presence of absolute coupling (100% + 15% MRP).

Results: statistically significant differences in MRP occurred for coupling, frequency and group, and post hoc analysis indicated that the adult group differed from both the DCD and TD groups, who did not differ from each other. In VRP, there were significant main effects for coupling and group, and a significant interaction between group and frequency, with post hoc analysis indicating the DCD group to be different from the TD and adult groups. Qualitatively, both the adult and TD groups increased in the number of participants who adopt absolute coupling as frequency increases. In contrast, the DCD participants adopt this absolute coupling far less frequently overall; in fact, the number of participants adopting this pattern decreases as frequency increases.

Conclusions: these results indicate that children with DCD have difficulties with both the co-ordination and the control of their perception–action coupling for this particular task

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Published date: 2006
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361955
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361955
ISSN: 0305-1862
PURE UUID: 858c484e-5504-4259-a89a-1b97b44511b7

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Date deposited: 06 Feb 2014 13:57
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:12

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