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Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes

Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes
Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes
As women get older their oocytes become susceptible to chromosome mis-segregation. This generates aneuploid embryos, leading to increased infertility and birth defects. Here we examined the provenance of aneuploidy by tracking chromosomes and their kinetochores in oocytes from young and aged mice. Changes consistent with chromosome cohesion deterioration were found with age, including increased interkinetochore distance and loss of the centromeric protector of cohesion SGO2 in metaphase II arrested (metII) eggs, as well as a rise in the number of weakly attached bivalents in meiosis I (MI) and lagging chromosomes at anaphase I. However, there were no MI errors in congression or biorientation. Instead, premature separation of dyads in meiosis II was the major segregation defect in aged eggs and these were associated with very low levels of SGO2. These data show that although considerable cohesion loss occurs during MI, its consequences are observed during meiosis II, when centromeric cohesion is needed to maintain dyad integrity
1477-9129
199-208
Yun, Y
aaa5ab77-a61c-4dcb-910b-76996272c6c8
Lane, SIR
8e80111f-5012-4950-a228-dfb8fb9df52d
Jones, KT
73e8e2b5-cd67-4691-b1a9-4e7bc9066af4
Yun, Y
aaa5ab77-a61c-4dcb-910b-76996272c6c8
Lane, SIR
8e80111f-5012-4950-a228-dfb8fb9df52d
Jones, KT
73e8e2b5-cd67-4691-b1a9-4e7bc9066af4

Yun, Y, Lane, SIR and Jones, KT (2014) Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes. Development, 141 (1), 199-208. (doi:10.1242/dev.100206).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As women get older their oocytes become susceptible to chromosome mis-segregation. This generates aneuploid embryos, leading to increased infertility and birth defects. Here we examined the provenance of aneuploidy by tracking chromosomes and their kinetochores in oocytes from young and aged mice. Changes consistent with chromosome cohesion deterioration were found with age, including increased interkinetochore distance and loss of the centromeric protector of cohesion SGO2 in metaphase II arrested (metII) eggs, as well as a rise in the number of weakly attached bivalents in meiosis I (MI) and lagging chromosomes at anaphase I. However, there were no MI errors in congression or biorientation. Instead, premature separation of dyads in meiosis II was the major segregation defect in aged eggs and these were associated with very low levels of SGO2. These data show that although considerable cohesion loss occurs during MI, its consequences are observed during meiosis II, when centromeric cohesion is needed to maintain dyad integrity

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 October 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 December 2013
Published date: 2014
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361957
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361957
ISSN: 1477-9129
PURE UUID: 9928f481-fe4c-4223-bf03-7e50056d1a2a
ORCID for SIR Lane: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8155-0981
ORCID for KT Jones: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0294-0851

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Feb 2014 11:27
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:37

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