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Developments in redox flow batteries

Developments in redox flow batteries
Developments in redox flow batteries
This thesis describes the investigation of the electrochemistry principles, technology, construction and composition of the electrode materials, electrolyte and additives used in redox flow batteries. The aim was to study a flow battery system with an appreciable working performance. The study explores and compares mainly three different redox flow battery technologies; all-vanadium, soluble lead-acid and a novel copper-lead dioxide flow batteries. The first system is based in sulfuric acid electrolyte environment whilst the other two are in methanesulfonic acid. Various cell parameters such as cell voltage, individual electrode potentials, flow rate and efficiencies (in particular voltage, charge and energy) have been utilized to compare. Further research in other redox couples and comparative study towards the design, construction and electrochemistry, along with the performance of these three batteries in relation to other electrochemical energy storage technologies available was also discussed. These technological studies are of particular interest for applications in the renewable energy storage (offshore and onshore) and sustainable energy research (grid integration and micro generation).
Tangirala, Ravichandra
6946839d-e392-489b-a1af-3561f00975c2
Tangirala, Ravichandra
6946839d-e392-489b-a1af-3561f00975c2
Ponce De Leon Albarran, Carlos
508a312e-75ff-4bcb-9151-dacc424d755c

Tangirala, Ravichandra (2011) Developments in redox flow batteries. University of Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Doctoral Thesis, 167pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis describes the investigation of the electrochemistry principles, technology, construction and composition of the electrode materials, electrolyte and additives used in redox flow batteries. The aim was to study a flow battery system with an appreciable working performance. The study explores and compares mainly three different redox flow battery technologies; all-vanadium, soluble lead-acid and a novel copper-lead dioxide flow batteries. The first system is based in sulfuric acid electrolyte environment whilst the other two are in methanesulfonic acid. Various cell parameters such as cell voltage, individual electrode potentials, flow rate and efficiencies (in particular voltage, charge and energy) have been utilized to compare. Further research in other redox couples and comparative study towards the design, construction and electrochemistry, along with the performance of these three batteries in relation to other electrochemical energy storage technologies available was also discussed. These technological studies are of particular interest for applications in the renewable energy storage (offshore and onshore) and sustainable energy research (grid integration and micro generation).

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More information

Published date: May 2011
Organisations: University of Southampton, Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361961
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361961
PURE UUID: 0e634b3e-8a42-4f75-8e24-082deba07c5e
ORCID for Carlos Ponce De Leon Albarran: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1907-5913

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Feb 2014 15:17
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:42

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Contributors

Author: Ravichandra Tangirala

University divisions

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