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How to get started with a systematic review in epidemiology: an introductory guide for early career researchers

How to get started with a systematic review in epidemiology: an introductory guide for early career researchers
How to get started with a systematic review in epidemiology: an introductory guide for early career researchers
Background: systematic review is a powerful research tool which aims to identify and synthesize all evidence relevant to a research question. The approach taken is much like that used in a scientific experiment, with high priority given to the transparency and reproducibility of the methods used and to handling all evidence in a consistent manner.

Early career researchers may find themselves in a position where they decide to undertake a systematic review, for example it may form part or all of a PhD thesis. Those with no prior experience of systematic review may need considerable support and direction getting started with such a project. Here we set out in simple terms how to get started with a systematic review.

Discussion: advice is given on matters such as developing a review protocol, searching using databases and other methods, data extraction, risk of bias assessment and data synthesis including meta-analysis. Signposts to further information and useful resources are also given.

Conclusion: a well-conducted systematic review benefits the scientific field by providing a summary of existing evidence and highlighting unanswered questions. For the individual, undertaking a systematic review is also a great opportunity to improve skills in critical appraisal and in synthesising evidence.
2049-3258
21
Denison, H.J.
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Dodds, R.M.
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Ntani, G.
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Cooper, R.
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Cooper, C.
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Sayer, A.A.
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Baird, Janis
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Denison, H.J.
dbe5f26d-6323-4477-9519-c826869b7810
Dodds, R.M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Ntani, G.
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Cooper, R.
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Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sayer, A.A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Baird, Janis
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Denison, H.J., Dodds, R.M., Ntani, G., Cooper, R., Cooper, C., Sayer, A.A. and Baird, Janis (2013) How to get started with a systematic review in epidemiology: an introductory guide for early career researchers. Archives of Public Health, 71 (1), 21. (doi:10.1186/0778-7367-71-21). (PMID:23919540)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: systematic review is a powerful research tool which aims to identify and synthesize all evidence relevant to a research question. The approach taken is much like that used in a scientific experiment, with high priority given to the transparency and reproducibility of the methods used and to handling all evidence in a consistent manner.

Early career researchers may find themselves in a position where they decide to undertake a systematic review, for example it may form part or all of a PhD thesis. Those with no prior experience of systematic review may need considerable support and direction getting started with such a project. Here we set out in simple terms how to get started with a systematic review.

Discussion: advice is given on matters such as developing a review protocol, searching using databases and other methods, data extraction, risk of bias assessment and data synthesis including meta-analysis. Signposts to further information and useful resources are also given.

Conclusion: a well-conducted systematic review benefits the scientific field by providing a summary of existing evidence and highlighting unanswered questions. For the individual, undertaking a systematic review is also a great opportunity to improve skills in critical appraisal and in synthesising evidence.

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Published date: 7 August 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362083
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362083
ISSN: 2049-3258
PURE UUID: 7673fda8-cd14-48f5-a8a8-c4016f748954
ORCID for R.M. Dodds: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4968-7678
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Janis Baird: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4039-4361

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Date deposited: 14 Feb 2014 09:47
Last modified: 10 Jul 2020 00:28

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Contributors

Author: H.J. Denison
Author: R.M. Dodds ORCID iD
Author: G. Ntani
Author: R. Cooper
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: A.A. Sayer
Author: Janis Baird ORCID iD

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