The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Concept analysis of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)

Concept analysis of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
Concept analysis of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
PURPOSE: The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® ) is a US National Institutes of Health initiative that has produced self-report outcome measures, using a framework of physical, mental, and social health defined by the World Health Organization in 1948 (WHO, in Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 1948). The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a comprehensive classification system of health and health-related domains that was put forward in 2001. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks to support mapping of PROMIS instruments to the ICF classification system .

METHODS: We assessed the objectives and the classification schema of the PROMIS and ICF frameworks, followed by content analysis to determine whether PROMIS domain and sub-domain level health concepts can be linked to the ICF classification.

RESULTS: Both PROMIS and ICF are relevant to all individuals, irrespective of the presence of health conditions, person characteristics, or environmental factors in which persons live. PROMIS measures are intended to assess a person's experiences of his or her health, functional status, and well-being in multiple domains across physical, mental, and social dimensions. The ICF comprehensively describes human functioning from a biological, individual, and social perspective. The ICF supports classification of health and health-related states such as functioning, but is not a specific measure or assessment of health, per se. PROMIS domains and sub-domain concepts can be meaningfully mapped to ICF concepts.

CONCLUSIONS: Theoretical and conceptual similarities support the use of PROMIS instruments to operationalize self-reported measurement for many body function, activity and participation ICF concepts, as well as several environmental factor concepts. Differences observed in PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks provide a stimulus for future research and development.

0962-9343
1677-1686
Tucker, C.A.
1cb07651-3107-430d-b642-247f488f0e28
Cieza, A.
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Riley, A.W.
d055a7e9-94ec-439f-8e61-f32b93d1f011
Stucki, G.
a0a31092-5bde-4e54-a3b7-70427ac7923e
Lai, J.S.
986fe4cd-027a-4588-b295-cc2cce406892
Ustun, T.B.
36265d95-2157-42ec-9209-944ed4a89ca9
Kostanjsek, N.
67b66f74-a7fe-424e-9692-df6980cfdfb4
Riley, W.
32a116ef-587e-4f93-9e6f-e0db926edf70
Cella, D.
7819bd5d-ebe8-44db-a24e-9349a0547cdb
Forrest, C.B.
d6dca5f2-b4dc-40d7-a040-18b19f5bdf6d
Tucker, C.A.
1cb07651-3107-430d-b642-247f488f0e28
Cieza, A.
a0df25c5-ee2c-4580-82b3-d0a75591580e
Riley, A.W.
d055a7e9-94ec-439f-8e61-f32b93d1f011
Stucki, G.
a0a31092-5bde-4e54-a3b7-70427ac7923e
Lai, J.S.
986fe4cd-027a-4588-b295-cc2cce406892
Ustun, T.B.
36265d95-2157-42ec-9209-944ed4a89ca9
Kostanjsek, N.
67b66f74-a7fe-424e-9692-df6980cfdfb4
Riley, W.
32a116ef-587e-4f93-9e6f-e0db926edf70
Cella, D.
7819bd5d-ebe8-44db-a24e-9349a0547cdb
Forrest, C.B.
d6dca5f2-b4dc-40d7-a040-18b19f5bdf6d

Tucker, C.A., Cieza, A., Riley, A.W., Stucki, G., Lai, J.S., Ustun, T.B., Kostanjsek, N., Riley, W., Cella, D. and Forrest, C.B. (2014) Concept analysis of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Quality of Life Research, 23 (6), 1677-1686. (doi:10.1007/s11136-014-0622-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

PURPOSE: The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® ) is a US National Institutes of Health initiative that has produced self-report outcome measures, using a framework of physical, mental, and social health defined by the World Health Organization in 1948 (WHO, in Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 1948). The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a comprehensive classification system of health and health-related domains that was put forward in 2001. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks to support mapping of PROMIS instruments to the ICF classification system .

METHODS: We assessed the objectives and the classification schema of the PROMIS and ICF frameworks, followed by content analysis to determine whether PROMIS domain and sub-domain level health concepts can be linked to the ICF classification.

RESULTS: Both PROMIS and ICF are relevant to all individuals, irrespective of the presence of health conditions, person characteristics, or environmental factors in which persons live. PROMIS measures are intended to assess a person's experiences of his or her health, functional status, and well-being in multiple domains across physical, mental, and social dimensions. The ICF comprehensively describes human functioning from a biological, individual, and social perspective. The ICF supports classification of health and health-related states such as functioning, but is not a specific measure or assessment of health, per se. PROMIS domains and sub-domain concepts can be meaningfully mapped to ICF concepts.

CONCLUSIONS: Theoretical and conceptual similarities support the use of PROMIS instruments to operationalize self-reported measurement for many body function, activity and participation ICF concepts, as well as several environmental factor concepts. Differences observed in PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks provide a stimulus for future research and development.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 February 2014
Published date: February 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362195
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362195
ISSN: 0962-9343
PURE UUID: 5a44ae5c-009f-4bfe-bbf2-d410d31ba200

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Feb 2014 15:00
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: C.A. Tucker
Author: A. Cieza
Author: A.W. Riley
Author: G. Stucki
Author: J.S. Lai
Author: T.B. Ustun
Author: N. Kostanjsek
Author: W. Riley
Author: D. Cella
Author: C.B. Forrest

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×