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The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry

The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry
The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry
Hydrothermal venting often occurs at submarine volcanic calderas on island arc chains, typically at shallower depths than mid–ocean ridges. The effect of these systems on ocean biogeochemistry has been under-investigated to date. Here we show that hydrothermal effluent from an island arc caldera was rich in Fe(III) colloids (0.02–0.2?µm; 46% of total Fe), contributing to a fraction of hydrothermal Fe that was stable in ocean water. Iron(III) colloids from island arc calderas may be transferred into surrounding waters (generally 0–1500?m depth) by ocean currents, thereby potentially stimulating surface ocean primary productivity. Hydrothermal Fe oxyhydroxide particles (>0.2?µm) were also pervasive in the studied caldera and contained high concentrations of oxyanions of phosphorus (P), vanadium (V), arsenic (As), and manganese (Mn). Hydrothermal island arcs may be responsible for?>?50% of global hydrothermal P scavenging and?>?40% V scavenging, despite representing <10% of global hydrothermal fluid flow.
0094-8276
942-947
Hawkes, Jeffrey A.
19e298a9-b5bf-4987-bfea-07780ca5bd69
Connelly, Douglas P.
d49131bb-af38-4768-9953-7ae0b43e33c8
Rijkenberg, Micha J.A.
549cc6d0-6f1a-432f-863a-2988abcb25d3
Achterberg, Eric P.
685ce961-8c45-4503-9f03-50f6561202b9
Hawkes, Jeffrey A.
19e298a9-b5bf-4987-bfea-07780ca5bd69
Connelly, Douglas P.
d49131bb-af38-4768-9953-7ae0b43e33c8
Rijkenberg, Micha J.A.
549cc6d0-6f1a-432f-863a-2988abcb25d3
Achterberg, Eric P.
685ce961-8c45-4503-9f03-50f6561202b9

Hawkes, Jeffrey A., Connelly, Douglas P., Rijkenberg, Micha J.A. and Achterberg, Eric P. (2014) The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry. Geophysical Research Letters, 41 (3), 942-947. (doi:10.1002/2013GL058817).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Hydrothermal venting often occurs at submarine volcanic calderas on island arc chains, typically at shallower depths than mid–ocean ridges. The effect of these systems on ocean biogeochemistry has been under-investigated to date. Here we show that hydrothermal effluent from an island arc caldera was rich in Fe(III) colloids (0.02–0.2?µm; 46% of total Fe), contributing to a fraction of hydrothermal Fe that was stable in ocean water. Iron(III) colloids from island arc calderas may be transferred into surrounding waters (generally 0–1500?m depth) by ocean currents, thereby potentially stimulating surface ocean primary productivity. Hydrothermal Fe oxyhydroxide particles (>0.2?µm) were also pervasive in the studied caldera and contained high concentrations of oxyanions of phosphorus (P), vanadium (V), arsenic (As), and manganese (Mn). Hydrothermal island arcs may be responsible for?>?50% of global hydrothermal P scavenging and?>?40% V scavenging, despite representing <10% of global hydrothermal fluid flow.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 February 2014
Published date: 16 February 2014
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Marine Geoscience

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Local EPrints ID: 362281
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362281
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 2efa1be7-315a-4590-9b6d-b805fff343e3

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Date deposited: 19 Feb 2014 11:17
Last modified: 28 Oct 2019 21:00

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