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"I'll sell this and I'll buy them that": eBay and the management of possessions as stock

"I'll sell this and I'll buy them that": eBay and the management of possessions as stock
"I'll sell this and I'll buy them that": eBay and the management of possessions as stock
In this paper we document practices associated with selecting and selling previously owned goods through the online auction house and marketplace, eBay. More specifically, we discuss the processes through which the economic or exchange values of previously owned goods are re-activated and the role eBay plays in facilitating such practices. Drawing from phenomenological interviews with heavy eBay users from various backgrounds living in the South of England, we discuss key emerging themes on the ways in which eBay is used for the disposal of goods. We find that eBay fuels practices of disposal that may encourage the transformation of the humble pre-owned good into valuable stock. Besides those curative practices which have been captured in previous research into the divestment of possessions we find that work of another kind is required to move a used good back to a commodity phase in its career. We see this as turning used goods into stock. This transformation accelerates a good's biography as it enters the realm of the owned possession and then quickly returned to a sphere of exchange. In such process, goods become assets which are reinvested to fuel promiscuous consumer behaviours
1472-0817
305-315
Denegri-Knott, Janice
db2bfb78-a91f-4fa0-a15a-a611c41e3c19
Molesworth, Mike
48a49a79-1d99-4120-b0aa-578e42541724
Denegri-Knott, Janice
db2bfb78-a91f-4fa0-a15a-a611c41e3c19
Molesworth, Mike
48a49a79-1d99-4120-b0aa-578e42541724

Denegri-Knott, Janice and Molesworth, Mike (2009) "I'll sell this and I'll buy them that": eBay and the management of possessions as stock. Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 8 (6), 305-315. (doi:10.1002/cb.295).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this paper we document practices associated with selecting and selling previously owned goods through the online auction house and marketplace, eBay. More specifically, we discuss the processes through which the economic or exchange values of previously owned goods are re-activated and the role eBay plays in facilitating such practices. Drawing from phenomenological interviews with heavy eBay users from various backgrounds living in the South of England, we discuss key emerging themes on the ways in which eBay is used for the disposal of goods. We find that eBay fuels practices of disposal that may encourage the transformation of the humble pre-owned good into valuable stock. Besides those curative practices which have been captured in previous research into the divestment of possessions we find that work of another kind is required to move a used good back to a commodity phase in its career. We see this as turning used goods into stock. This transformation accelerates a good's biography as it enters the realm of the owned possession and then quickly returned to a sphere of exchange. In such process, goods become assets which are reinvested to fuel promiscuous consumer behaviours

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Published date: November 2009
Organisations: Centre for Relational Leadership & Change

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Local EPrints ID: 362336
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362336
ISSN: 1472-0817
PURE UUID: d06e11b5-b7d9-42a3-81a5-efbd3abf3d44

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Date deposited: 24 Feb 2014 08:33
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 18:54

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Contributors

Author: Janice Denegri-Knott
Author: Mike Molesworth

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