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The weak human and the saving grace of the welfare state: German pupils’ perception of future social change and drivers of change

The weak human and the saving grace of the welfare state: German pupils’ perception of future social change and drivers of change
The weak human and the saving grace of the welfare state: German pupils’ perception of future social change and drivers of change
Social change has often been seen as a desired goal of critical pedagogy. Interestingly; there is little research about how pupils in Germany perceive the concept of social change and what drives social change. This article presents the outcome of a three year long research project that aimed to analyse how a sample of German pupils makes sense of social change and what forces drive social change in society through future narratives (written assignments and interviews). The study finds that pupils have an implicit and explicit understanding of politics and the state as a driving force, but that this is challenged by external drivers such as the global economy/technology and internal drivers such as human self-interest/egoism and insecurity/fear. In this study, the pupils often describe the present economy as being organised and the future economy to become more and more disorganised. Using future narratives in critical pedagogy can be a way to work more closely with the students and their perceptions of social change and drivers of change
0016-3287
22-34
Nordensvärd, Johan
44e3b534-aa45-4124-9680-35e8fb6f2e98
Nordensvärd, Johan
44e3b534-aa45-4124-9680-35e8fb6f2e98

Nordensvärd, Johan (2013) The weak human and the saving grace of the welfare state: German pupils’ perception of future social change and drivers of change. Futures, 49, 22-34. (doi:10.1016/j.futures.2013.03.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Social change has often been seen as a desired goal of critical pedagogy. Interestingly; there is little research about how pupils in Germany perceive the concept of social change and what drives social change. This article presents the outcome of a three year long research project that aimed to analyse how a sample of German pupils makes sense of social change and what forces drive social change in society through future narratives (written assignments and interviews). The study finds that pupils have an implicit and explicit understanding of politics and the state as a driving force, but that this is challenged by external drivers such as the global economy/technology and internal drivers such as human self-interest/egoism and insecurity/fear. In this study, the pupils often describe the present economy as being organised and the future economy to become more and more disorganised. Using future narratives in critical pedagogy can be a way to work more closely with the students and their perceptions of social change and drivers of change

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Published date: 2013
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362371
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362371
ISSN: 0016-3287
PURE UUID: df63b578-5b9d-4fbe-9411-659733637afb

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Date deposited: 21 Feb 2014 11:30
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 01:01

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Author: Johan Nordensvärd

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