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Reward: commentary: temporal discounting in conduct disorder: toward an experience-adaptation hypothesis of the role of psychosocial insecurity

Reward: commentary: temporal discounting in conduct disorder: toward an experience-adaptation hypothesis of the role of psychosocial insecurity
Reward: commentary: temporal discounting in conduct disorder: toward an experience-adaptation hypothesis of the role of psychosocial insecurity
Young people with conduct disorder often experience histories of psychosocial adversity and socioeconomic insecurity. For these individuals, real-world future outcomes are not only delayed in their delivery but also highly uncertain. Under such circumstances, accentuated time preference (extreme favoring of the present over the future) is a rational response to the everyday reality of social and economic transactions. Building on this observation, the author sets out the hypothesis that the exaggerated temporal discounting displayed by individuals with conduct disorder reported by White et al. (2014) is an adaptation to chronic exposure to psychosocial insecurity during development. The author postulates that this adaptation leads to (a) a decision-making bias whereby delay and uncertainty are coded as inseparable characteristics of choice outcomes and/or (b) reprogramming of the brain networks regulating intertemporal decision making. Future research could explore the putative role of environmental exposures to adversity in the development of exaggerated temporal discounting in conduct disorder as well as the mediating role of putative cognitive and neurobiological adaptations.

0885-579X
19-24
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635

Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S. (2014) Reward: commentary: temporal discounting in conduct disorder: toward an experience-adaptation hypothesis of the role of psychosocial insecurity. [in special issue: A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective on Personality Disorder ] Journal of Personality Disorders, 28 (1), 19-24. (doi:10.1521/pedi.2014.28.1.19).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Young people with conduct disorder often experience histories of psychosocial adversity and socioeconomic insecurity. For these individuals, real-world future outcomes are not only delayed in their delivery but also highly uncertain. Under such circumstances, accentuated time preference (extreme favoring of the present over the future) is a rational response to the everyday reality of social and economic transactions. Building on this observation, the author sets out the hypothesis that the exaggerated temporal discounting displayed by individuals with conduct disorder reported by White et al. (2014) is an adaptation to chronic exposure to psychosocial insecurity during development. The author postulates that this adaptation leads to (a) a decision-making bias whereby delay and uncertainty are coded as inseparable characteristics of choice outcomes and/or (b) reprogramming of the brain networks regulating intertemporal decision making. Future research could explore the putative role of environmental exposures to adversity in the development of exaggerated temporal discounting in conduct disorder as well as the mediating role of putative cognitive and neurobiological adaptations.

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Published date: 2014
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

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Local EPrints ID: 362376
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362376
ISSN: 0885-579X
PURE UUID: 0ed73168-84e6-49c5-8c37-ff06c581eb43

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Date deposited: 24 Feb 2014 12:19
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 12:10

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Contributors

Author: Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke

University divisions

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