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First epigravettian ceramic figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia)

First epigravettian ceramic figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia)
First epigravettian ceramic figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia)
Recent finds of 36 ceramic artifacts from the archaeological site of Vela Spila, Croatia, offer the first evidence of ceramic figurative art in late Upper Palaeolithic Europe, c. 17,500–15,000 years before present (BP). The size and diversity of this artistic ceramic assemblage indicate the emergence of a social tradition, rather than more ephemeral experimentation with a new material. Vela Spila ceramics offer compelling technological and stylistic comparisons with the only other evidence of a developed Palaeolithic ceramic tradition found at the sites of Pavlov I and Dolní V?stonice I, in the Czech Republic, c. 31,000–27,000 cal BP. Because of the 10,000-year gap between the two assemblages, the Vela Spila ceramics are interpreted as evidence of an independent invention of this technology. Consequently, these artifacts provide evidence of a new social context in which ceramics developed and were used to make art in the Upper Palaeolithic.
1932-6203
e41437
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2
Radic, Dinko
c5cbeb37-4bf1-4e88-8405-f2c9b57a26f6
Brajkovic, Dejana
0aa8373c-86b1-4537-a49c-997a246a225b
Miracle, Preston T.
c6f72943-e061-4180-94c0-701ea7b27543
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2
Radic, Dinko
c5cbeb37-4bf1-4e88-8405-f2c9b57a26f6
Brajkovic, Dejana
0aa8373c-86b1-4537-a49c-997a246a225b
Miracle, Preston T.
c6f72943-e061-4180-94c0-701ea7b27543

Farbstein, Rebecca, Radic, Dinko, Brajkovic, Dejana and Miracle, Preston T. (2012) First epigravettian ceramic figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia). PLoS ONE, 7 (7), e41437. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041437).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent finds of 36 ceramic artifacts from the archaeological site of Vela Spila, Croatia, offer the first evidence of ceramic figurative art in late Upper Palaeolithic Europe, c. 17,500–15,000 years before present (BP). The size and diversity of this artistic ceramic assemblage indicate the emergence of a social tradition, rather than more ephemeral experimentation with a new material. Vela Spila ceramics offer compelling technological and stylistic comparisons with the only other evidence of a developed Palaeolithic ceramic tradition found at the sites of Pavlov I and Dolní V?stonice I, in the Czech Republic, c. 31,000–27,000 cal BP. Because of the 10,000-year gap between the two assemblages, the Vela Spila ceramics are interpreted as evidence of an independent invention of this technology. Consequently, these artifacts provide evidence of a new social context in which ceramics developed and were used to make art in the Upper Palaeolithic.

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Farbstein et al 2012.pdf - Version of Record
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Published date: 2012
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362514
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362514
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: b42aecdf-5e6d-49dd-b270-8912ff7f89dd

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Date deposited: 26 Feb 2014 15:16
Last modified: 02 Dec 2019 20:45

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Farbstein
Author: Dinko Radic
Author: Dejana Brajkovic
Author: Preston T. Miracle

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