The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Making art, making society: the social significance of smallscale innovations and experimentation in Palaeolithic portable art

Making art, making society: the social significance of smallscale innovations and experimentation in Palaeolithic portable art
Making art, making society: the social significance of smallscale innovations and experimentation in Palaeolithic portable art
This paper discusses how the making of art – the materials, techniques, and gestures used during production – was culturally meaningful and socially variable during the European Upper Palaeolithic. Although much previous research has focused on persistent and functional innovations, studying small-scale and ephemeral innovations reveals the extent to which technological experimentation had an impact on artistic expression. Comparing the record of several archaeological sites purported to be in the same technocomplex helps to differentiate the presence of ‘social boundaries’ (sensu Dietler and Herbich 1998) and discern the extent to which groups shared knowledge and cultural, technical, and artistic traditions. In this paper, ceramic art from two distinct contexts (Czech Republic at c. 30,000 BP and Croatia at c. 17,500 BP) will be discussed to explore the role of small-scale innovation in shaping and transforming Upper Palaeolithic art and society.
2150-0894
23-39
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2

Farbstein, Rebecca (2013) Making art, making society: the social significance of smallscale innovations and experimentation in Palaeolithic portable art. [in special issue: Art Makes Society] World Art, 3 (1), 23-39. (doi:10.1080/21500894.2013.773935).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper discusses how the making of art – the materials, techniques, and gestures used during production – was culturally meaningful and socially variable during the European Upper Palaeolithic. Although much previous research has focused on persistent and functional innovations, studying small-scale and ephemeral innovations reveals the extent to which technological experimentation had an impact on artistic expression. Comparing the record of several archaeological sites purported to be in the same technocomplex helps to differentiate the presence of ‘social boundaries’ (sensu Dietler and Herbich 1998) and discern the extent to which groups shared knowledge and cultural, technical, and artistic traditions. In this paper, ceramic art from two distinct contexts (Czech Republic at c. 30,000 BP and Croatia at c. 17,500 BP) will be discussed to explore the role of small-scale innovation in shaping and transforming Upper Palaeolithic art and society.

Text
Farbstein 2013.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 2013
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362547
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362547
ISSN: 2150-0894
PURE UUID: 35840b9d-40d2-491a-826d-726b327b9754

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Feb 2014 11:29
Last modified: 09 Jul 2020 16:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×