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Optical amplifiers - a telecommunications revolution

Optical amplifiers - a telecommunications revolution
Optical amplifiers - a telecommunications revolution
In the early 1960s it was widely recognised by telecommunications engineers that existing electrical transmission technologies (twisted-pair, coaxial cables) would be inadequate for the rapidly-developing telecommunications industry. The needs of wideband distribution networks to carry video and digital data, as well as the burgeoning telephone traffic, could not be met by foreseeable advances in electrical transmission. Consequently research focussed on the huge bandwidth offered by optical transmission, initially in free space but later in guided-wave form, to provide the wideband services of the future. In 1966 Dr Charles K Kao (a previous C&C Award Winner) demonstrated the feasibility of using glass optical fibres as a transmission conduit - the optical equivalent of the coaxial cable.
Payne, D.N.
4f592b24-707f-456e-b2c6-8a6f750e296d
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324
Payne, D.N.
4f592b24-707f-456e-b2c6-8a6f750e296d
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324

Payne, D.N. and Gambling, W.A. (1993) Optical amplifiers - a telecommunications revolution. Commemorative Address, C & C Awards, Japan.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

In the early 1960s it was widely recognised by telecommunications engineers that existing electrical transmission technologies (twisted-pair, coaxial cables) would be inadequate for the rapidly-developing telecommunications industry. The needs of wideband distribution networks to carry video and digital data, as well as the burgeoning telephone traffic, could not be met by foreseeable advances in electrical transmission. Consequently research focussed on the huge bandwidth offered by optical transmission, initially in free space but later in guided-wave form, to provide the wideband services of the future. In 1966 Dr Charles K Kao (a previous C&C Award Winner) demonstrated the feasibility of using glass optical fibres as a transmission conduit - the optical equivalent of the coaxial cable.

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e-pub ahead of print date: October 1993
Venue - Dates: Commemorative Address, C & C Awards, Japan, 1993-10-01

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362738
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362738
PURE UUID: b8138d48-e737-4f55-9c4a-5f6c320e6995

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2014 10:38
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:48

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