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Understanding how we age: insights into inflammaging

Understanding how we age: insights into inflammaging
Understanding how we age: insights into inflammaging


Inflammaging is characterized by the upregulation of the inflammatory response that occurs with advancing age; its roots are strongly embedded in evolutionary theory.

Inflammaging is believed to be a consequence of a remodelling of the innate and acquired immune system, resulting in chronic inflammatory cytokine production.

Complex interrelated genetic, environmental and age-related factors determine an individual’s vulnerability or resilience to inflammaging. These factors include polymorphisms to the promoter regions of cytokines, cytokine receptors and antagonists, age-related decreases in autophagy and increased adiposity. Anti-inflammaging describes the upregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in response to inflammaging, leading to higher levels of cortisol, which in turn may be detrimental, contributing to less successful ageing and frailty. This may be countered by the adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone, which itself declines with age, leaving certain individuals more vulnerable. Inflammaging and anti-inflammaging have both been linked with a number of age-related outcomes, including chronic morbidity, functional decline and mortality. This important area of research offers unique insights into the ageing process and the potential for screening and targeted interventions.
ageing, cortisol, DHEAS, frailty, inflammaging, inflammation, older people
1-8
Baylis, D.
81f774ef-9139-48bd-8360-d20ebedaa492
Bartlett, D.B.
ddbf0afd-d0fd-4def-8ead-3bd1304282a9
Patel, H.P.
6a3fce01-9f35-468a-8dce-38b31d3a60fa
Roberts, H.C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Baylis, D.
81f774ef-9139-48bd-8360-d20ebedaa492
Bartlett, D.B.
ddbf0afd-d0fd-4def-8ead-3bd1304282a9
Patel, H.P.
6a3fce01-9f35-468a-8dce-38b31d3a60fa
Roberts, H.C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Baylis, D., Bartlett, D.B., Patel, H.P. and Roberts, H.C. (2013) Understanding how we age: insights into inflammaging. Longevity & Healthspan, 2 (1), 1-8. (doi:10.1186/2046-2395-2-8). (PMID:24472098)

Record type: Article

Abstract



Inflammaging is characterized by the upregulation of the inflammatory response that occurs with advancing age; its roots are strongly embedded in evolutionary theory.

Inflammaging is believed to be a consequence of a remodelling of the innate and acquired immune system, resulting in chronic inflammatory cytokine production.

Complex interrelated genetic, environmental and age-related factors determine an individual’s vulnerability or resilience to inflammaging. These factors include polymorphisms to the promoter regions of cytokines, cytokine receptors and antagonists, age-related decreases in autophagy and increased adiposity. Anti-inflammaging describes the upregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in response to inflammaging, leading to higher levels of cortisol, which in turn may be detrimental, contributing to less successful ageing and frailty. This may be countered by the adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone, which itself declines with age, leaving certain individuals more vulnerable. Inflammaging and anti-inflammaging have both been linked with a number of age-related outcomes, including chronic morbidity, functional decline and mortality. This important area of research offers unique insights into the ageing process and the potential for screening and targeted interventions.

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More information

Published date: 2 May 2013
Keywords: ageing, cortisol, DHEAS, frailty, inflammaging, inflammation, older people
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362757
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362757
PURE UUID: b8dd87b2-6465-4f21-925a-73325fcff9b6

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2014 15:45
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:48

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Contributors

Author: D. Baylis
Author: D.B. Bartlett
Author: H.P. Patel
Author: H.C. Roberts

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